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I'm writing a simple server for my networks class and I am having trouble getting data transferred to the client (provided by the prof) correctly.

Once I get through all the setup and the connection is established I start reading chunks of the file and writing them to the socket checking to see that the return from the read and write functions match. I'm also keeping a running total of the bytes that are read/written and comparing that to the total file size (via stat.st_size) and they all match up.

No matter how many times I request the same file the log on the server side always has the correct metrics. The client sporadically loses the end of the file. The difference between the actual and expected size is almost never the same from one invocation to the next and it appears to always be the end of the file that's missing, no pieces from the middle. The size of the arrived file is also a multiple of 512 (the chunk size).

So, it seems that some number of whole chunks are making it and then the rest are getting lost somehow.:w

#define CHUNK_SIZE     512
/* other definitions */

int main()
{
   /* basic server setup: socket(), bind(), listen() ...  
      variable declarations and other setup  */

   while(1)
   {
      int cliSock = accept(srvSock, NULL, NULL);
      if(cliSock < 0)
         ; /* handle error */

      read(cliSock, filename, FILE_NAME_SIZE - 1);
      int reqFile = open(filename, O_RDONLY);
      if( reqFile == -1)
         ; /* handle error */

      struct stat fileStat;
      fstat(reqFile, &fileStat);
      int fileSize = fileStat.st_size;

      int bytesRead, totalBytesRead = 0;
      char chunk[CHUNK_SIZE];
      while((bytesRead = read(reqFile, chunk, CHUNK_SIZE)) > 0)
      {
         totalBytesRead += byteasRead;
         if(write(cliSock, chunk, bytesRead) != bytesRead)
         {
            /* perror(...) */
            /* print an error to the log file */
            bytesRead = -1;
            break;
         }
      }
      if (bytesRead == -1)
      {
         /* perror(...) */
         /* print an error to the log file */
         close(cliSock);
         continue;
      }

      /* more code to write transfer metrics etc to the log file */
   }
}

All of the removed error handling code is some flavor of printing an error message to the log file and getting back to the top of the loop.


Edit flipped a < that should have been >

share|improve this question
    
If it returns 0 then we reached the end of the file the while loop exits (while(0)) and the if statement skips us over the error code and we move on to printing the transfer metrics –  Matt Nov 30 '11 at 1:08
    
Your confusion might have been caused by the fact I mis-typed the conditional operator on that line. Honestly, the other way it wouldn't make sense at all. –  Matt Nov 30 '11 at 1:15
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Presumably you are unceremoniously closing the socket with close() when you have written all the data you wanted to the socket (or perhaps just exiting the process, which does the same thing).

This is not right - if the other side has sent some data that you haven't read1, the connection will be reset. The reset can cause unread data to be lost.

Instead, you should use shutdown() to gracefully shutdown the writing side of the socket, then wait for the client to close. Something like:

ssize_t bytesRead;
char chunk[CHUNK_SIZE];

shutdown(cliSock, SHUT_WR);

while((bytesRead = read(cliSock, chunk, CHUNK_SIZE)) != 0)
{
    if (bytesRead < 0)
    {
        if (errno != EINTR)
        {
            /* perror() */
            /* print error in log file */
            break;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        /* maybe log data from client */
    }
}

close(cliSock);


1. This can include EOF, if the other side has closed its writing channel.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not expecting any more response from the client. The client makes an initial request which the server reads. Just a string with the file name. Server looks for the file in the working directory, and then sends the file. The client closes the connection as soon as the read loop completes. I'll try shutdown(cliSock, SHUT_RDWR) and see if that makes a difference. Note: the read loop is reading from the local file and sending data, not reading from the connection. –  Matt Nov 30 '11 at 1:22
    
@Matt: Using SHUT_RDWR won't help. The idea is that there should be an interlocked close handshake between the two sides. The code I've shown will work if the client closes its connection after seeing EOF from the server - the final read() after SHUT_WR on the server side will return 0 at that point, which is what you're waiting for. –  caf Nov 30 '11 at 1:38
    
So this is kind of like flushing an output stream? I'm about to sit down and implement it. Let myself get roped into putting lights on the tree :) –  Matt Nov 30 '11 at 5:15
    
Worked like a charm. I was wondering if you could shed some more light on the under the hood workings that lead to this. –  Matt Nov 30 '11 at 5:27
    
@Matt: If a peer shuts down the reading side of its socket without reading all the data that has been sent (and this includes the end-of-file notification that is sent when the other side closes its writing side), a connection reset is sent to the other side to inform it of that fact. A connection reset is asynchronous, so it can leapfrog over some data that's been sent - the error can be reported before all the data has been read. In summary, you should never shut down the reading side of your socket until read() has returned 0 (or a fatal error). –  caf Nov 30 '11 at 5:47
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