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Is there any way to detect change in an integer? Such as creating a listener to listen to the integer to detect and change in value it has. I know this is possible with booleans with a few tricks but I cannot seem to adapt this to an int value. Does anyone have any idea how this could be done? I need to know how to do this in the Java language. Below is code that I found online that allows for a boolean listener. How can I convert this to an integer listener?

import java.util.List;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.EventListener;
import java.util.EventObject;
import java.awt.EventQueue; 

//can u see this austin? can u see this i typed this at 9:33 my time
/**
 * This class uses the EventQueue to process its events, but you should only 
 * really do this if the changes you make have an impact on part of a GUI 
 * eg. adding a button to a JFrame.
 *
 * Otherwise, you should create your own event dispatch thread that can handle
 * change events
 */
public class test1 implements BooleanChangeDispatcher {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        BooleanChangeListener listener = new BooleanChangeListener() { // add this to the class
            @Override
            public void stateChanged(BooleanChangeEvent event) {
                System.out.println("Detected change to: "
                    + event.getDispatcher().getFlag()
                    + " -- event: " + event);
            }
        };

        test1 test = new test1(false);
        test.addBooleanChangeListener(listener);

//        test.setFlag(false); // no change, no event dispatch
//        test.setFlag(true); // changed to true -- event dispatched

    }

    private boolean flag;
    private List<BooleanChangeListener> listeners;

    public test1(boolean initialFlagState) {
        flag = initialFlagState;
        listeners = new ArrayList<BooleanChangeListener>();
    }

    @Override   
    public void addBooleanChangeListener(BooleanChangeListener listener) {
        listeners.add(listener);
    }

    @Override
    public void setFlag(boolean flag) {
        if (this.flag != flag) {
            this.flag = flag;
            dispatchEvent();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean getFlag() {
        return flag;
    }

    private void dispatchEvent() {
        final BooleanChangeEvent event = new BooleanChangeEvent(this);
        for (BooleanChangeListener l : listeners) {
            dispatchRunnableOnEventQueue(l, event);
        }
    }

    private void dispatchRunnableOnEventQueue(
                final BooleanChangeListener listener, 
                final BooleanChangeEvent event) {

        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                listener.stateChanged(event);
            }
        });
    }

}

interface BooleanChangeDispatcher {

    public void addBooleanChangeListener(BooleanChangeListener listener);
    public boolean getFlag();
    public void setFlag(boolean flag);

}

/**
 * Listener interface for classes interested in knowing about a boolean
 * flag change.
 */
interface BooleanChangeListener extends EventListener {

    public void stateChanged(BooleanChangeEvent event);

}

/** 
 * This class lets the listener know when the change occured and what 
 * object was changed.
 */
class BooleanChangeEvent extends EventObject {

    private final BooleanChangeDispatcher dispatcher;

    public BooleanChangeEvent(BooleanChangeDispatcher dispatcher) {
        super(dispatcher);
        this.dispatcher = dispatcher;
    }

    // type safe way to get source (as opposed to getSource of EventObject
    public BooleanChangeDispatcher getDispatcher() {
        return dispatcher;
    }
}
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1  
do you have a preferred language? –  Kai Qing Nov 30 '11 at 0:48
2  
Is this a single integer that is changed from one place? How did you do it with booleans? –  birryree Nov 30 '11 at 0:54
1  
I don't know what "tricks" you are talking about that would work with booleans and not integers. Show us the code. –  Stephen C Nov 30 '11 at 0:59
1  
@MrDrProfessorTyler - you haven't addressed my comment. Why can't you adapt the code for a boolean listener to a integer listener? Show us the code. –  Stephen C Nov 30 '11 at 1:03
1  
@MrDrProfessorTyler the code you posted can be adapted by just replacing Boolean/boolean with Integer/int. For readability's sake you'd probably also want to change Flag/flag to Value/value. –  Laurence Gonsalves Nov 30 '11 at 1:17
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would create a class capable of registering listeners. Below is a mocked up example. It might even compile as is (assuming you write the corresponding VocalIntegerListener interface exists and is implemented somehow... it's pretty simple).

class VocalInteger {

    private int value;
    private final Object lock = new Object();
    Set<VocalIntegerListener> listeners; // assume interface exists - it's easy


    public VocalInteger() {
        this(0);
    }

    public VocalInteger(int value) {
        this.value = value;
        listeners = new HashSet<VocalIntegerListener>();
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(int value) {
        synchronized(lock) {
            int oldValue = this.value;
            this.value = value;
            for(VocalIntegerListener listener : listeners) {
                listener.fireChangedEvent(oldvalue, value); // assume exists
            }
        }
    }

    public void registerListener(VocalIntegerListener listener) {
        synchronized(lock) {
            listeners.add(listener);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well I guess I am asking how to I create such an interface? –  MrDrProfessorTyler Nov 30 '11 at 1:02
    
Some of this can be done with Observable (if people still use that class). –  David Z Nov 30 '11 at 1:04
1  
@glowcoder: ouch. My JCIP book is crying. What if different threads are used to register listener(s) and to call setValue? ; ) I mean, for listeners: List and new CopyOnWriteArrayList, sure... But Set and unsynchronized add? Ouch. Just ouch. : ) –  TacticalCoder Nov 30 '11 at 1:06
    
@MrDrProfessorTyler: if you don't know how to create an interface, then I don't think Stack Overflow is the place to be looking for help on that. You need to consult whichever textbook or tutorial website you're using, or ask whoever is teaching you the language to explain how to create interfaces. –  David Z Nov 30 '11 at 1:07
1  
@glowcoder: Uh!? You commented: "In fact, whith this way you know when another thread changed the value" and "yes, that would require synchronization". I'm sorry but these two sentences do not compute. My point was precisely that if you register a listener from another thread then, because your synchronization is broken, no, you are definitely not guaranteed to "know when another thread changed the value". That is precisely my point. At 20K+ rep, instead of defending your broken piece of code, why don't you simply fix it by editing your answer? ; ) –  TacticalCoder Nov 30 '11 at 15:19
show 6 more comments

Have a look at "Java Beans" and "bound properties" for the standard approach how to listen for property changed events:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/javabeans/writing/properties.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/javabeans/

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