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I have a problem when I try to compare two large files. What I am trying to do is take a line from one file, search all the lines of another file for a match and if there isn't one, write that line to another file. I was able to recreate the problem with the simple example below:

file1.txt (contents)

apple
banana
pear
peach
lime

file_old.txt (contents)

lime
apple
pear
peach

Since I am looking for lines in file1 that are not in file_old, I would expect that 'banana' would be the only value to show in the output file. But in the output file, "*fill_diff*", I am showing:

apple
banana
banana

What is wrong with my code to try and produce the differences in a file?

def main():

    file_old = open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file_old.txt', 'r+')
    file_new = open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file1.txt', 'r+')
    file_diff = open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file_diff.txt', 'w')

    for each_line in file_new: 
        for every_line in file_old:
            if each_line == every_line:
                break
            file_diff.write(each_line)

    file_old.close()
    file_new.close()
    file_diff.close()

main()

Thanks!

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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

srgerg's answer will work.

However, reading through files multiple times will have a very large runtime complexity. Therefore, if the files (though large) are small enough to fit into memory, then you might consider putting all the lines in file_old into a data structure for comparison:

old_lines = set((line.strip() for line in open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file_old.txt', 'r+')))
file_new = open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file1.txt', 'r+')
file_diff = open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file_diff.txt', 'w')

for line in file_new:
    if line.strip() not in old_lines:
        file_diff.write(line)
file_new.close()
file_diff.close()

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's actually kind of cool. Is there any place that you know of in the python docs or online that explains more about the data structure you used in line 1? –  Lance Collins Nov 30 '11 at 1:35
    
Sure. It's called a set. It's like a list, but has O(1) lookup time as it is implemented with hashing. You can read more about it here –  inspectorG4dget Nov 30 '11 at 1:40
    
a set is a concept taken from mathematics, it is very useful in many places. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_(abstract_data_type) once understood it makes a lot of things very easy. –  sleeplessnerd Nov 30 '11 at 1:40
    
inspectorG4dget has the old link.. New link: sets –  John Doe Nov 30 '11 at 1:40
    
Thanks John Doe, for the update. I didn't know I had the wrong link –  inspectorG4dget Nov 30 '11 at 1:42
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You can do this in O(n + n*log(n)) by sorting both files first and then iterate over both simultaneously.

# sort file1 and file2 on disk or in memory
while len(file1) > 0 and len(file2) > 0:
    while file1[0] < file2[0]:
        diff.append(file1[0])
        file1 = file1[1:]
    while file1[0] > file2[0]:
        diff.append(file2[0])
        file2 = file2[1:]
    while file1[0] == file2[0]:
        file1 = file1[1:]
        file2 = file2[1:]
diff = diff + file1 + file2 # add the rest to the diff
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this is going to have a runtime much higher than O(n*log(n)) - more like O(n^3). This is due to the first while loop's O(n) and each inner while loop's O(n^2) (caused by linear time complexity of the list splicing) –  inspectorG4dget Nov 30 '11 at 1:47
    
this was just to make the code concise and very simple to read. normally you would iterate over file objects, but this was done quickly out of my head. –  sleeplessnerd Nov 30 '11 at 3:05
    
My comments were not in response to the readability of your code, but to your analysis of its runtime. Also, iterating over file objects would result in an O(n^2) algorithm, which is still pretty inefficient –  inspectorG4dget Nov 30 '11 at 5:28
    
look again please, when ignoring the array slicing complexity this code is sorting + O(n) –  sleeplessnerd Nov 30 '11 at 22:18
    
Yes. Ignoring list splicing, you have sorting (O(n*log(n))) + O(n). O(n*log(n)) dominates, so your runtime is O(n*log(n)) –  inspectorG4dget Dec 1 '11 at 17:36
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FWIW, the difflib module was designed for this kind of use case.

If you need to do it manually, Python's sets can make it easier:

file_diff = open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file_diff.txt', 'w')
oldlines = set(open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file_old.txt', 'r'))
for line in open(r'C:\Users\test\Desktop\file1.txt', 'r'):
    if line not in oldlines:
        file_diff.write(line)
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I suspect you want missing lines in any order?

This is a quick and dirty implementation based on set():

def readfile(name):
    afile = open(name, 'r+')
    lines = set([l.strip() for l in afile])
    afile.close()
    return lines

def main():
    oldset = readfile(r'file_old.txt')
    newset = readfile(r'file1.txt')

    file_diff = open(r'file_diff.txt', 'w')

    for diff in (newset - oldset):
        file_diff.write(diff)

    file_diff.close()

main()

This may not scale too well for very large input files.

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You need to go back to the beginning of file_old at the beginning of each iteration of your loop. Something like this:

for each_line in file_new:
    file_old.seek(0)
    for every_line in file_old:
        ...

Also, the logic of your innermost loop seems wrong. I think you want something like

for each_line in file_new:
    file_old.seek(0)
    found = False
    for every_line in file_old:
        if each_line == every_line:
            found = True
            break

    if not found:
        file_diff.write(each_line)
share|improve this answer
    
I can't get it to work. If I add file_old.seek(0) where you have it in your example then I get even more output than I am expecting. Could it be the placement of the break statement? –  Lance Collins Nov 30 '11 at 1:28
1  
I edited my answer with a correction to the logic of your innermost loop. Check my answer again for the full scoop. –  srgerg Nov 30 '11 at 1:31
    
Thank you very much for the help! –  Lance Collins Nov 30 '11 at 1:40
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If you can't assume the files are sorted, then I'd do something like this

def diffUnsorted(fn1, fn2) :
    return set([l.strip() for l in open(fn1) if l.strip() != ""]) - \
           set([l.strip() for l in open(fn2) if l.strip() != ""])

If you're going to be dealing with large files though, I'd go with a solution that sorts the files first, which gets you O(n) time and O(1) space (not counting the sorting..).

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