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I have the following code at the end of an .each() function that loops close to 50 times.

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/process.php",
    data:  "info="+info,
    success: function(html){
        // $('#container').html(html);          
    }
});

How can I pause the script during each iteration so it will wait until each ajax post is successful before executing the next .each()?

I'm basically trying to prevent the queuing of ajax requests.

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are you trying to block issuing each AJAX request until the subsequent one returns? For what purpose? –  wrschneider99 Nov 30 '11 at 3:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't use an explicit loop. Move each next-ajax call into the success handler of the previous one. Or queue the requests programmatically.

var numRequests = 50;

function nextAjax()
{
    if (numRequests > 0)
    {
        $.ajax({
            // snip...
            success: function (html) {
                // $('#container').html(html);
                nextAjax();
            }    
        });
    }

    numRequests--;
}

nextAjax();
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All you need to do is add an async:false property. For example:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/process.php",
    data:  "info="+info,
    async: false,
    success: function(html){
        // $('#container').html(html);          
    }
});

However, you should be aware that this will essentially "freeze" the page until all the AJAX calls complete. Making a synchronous request like this is rarely a necessity, so unless you're doing this for some kind of internal use where user experience isn't very important, I'd strongly encourage you to try coming up with an asynchronous way of achieving what you're after.

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1  
Please don't do this. It it a huge cause for UI hangs. This has been discussed many places, including here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5399080/… –  Jonathan M Nov 30 '11 at 3:04
    
Eeeeeew, no. This will hang the browser in a most nasty, unnecessary manner, while the requests are in progress. –  Matt Ball Nov 30 '11 at 3:04
    
For 99.9% of caes I totally agree. Hence my immediate edit. –  maxedison Nov 30 '11 at 3:07
2  
There's a special place in hell for people who use or recommend async:false. –  Raynos Nov 30 '11 at 3:14
1  
Ok, well if the OP comes back with a new post about how he implemented a synchronous request on a page for anything other than internal use, we'll all gang up on him :) –  maxedison Nov 30 '11 at 16:57

Have the callback function kick off the next request.

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