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The code below does not work, because the replacement string for \10, \11, and so on, cannot be read properly. It reads \10 as \1 and print 0 instead, can you help me fix it? There is an answer in one of the threads, saying that I am supposed to use capturing or naming groups, but I don't really understand how to use them.

headline <- gsub("regexp with 10 () brackets",
"\\1 ### \\2 ### \\3 ### \\4 ### \\5 ### \\6 ### \\7 ### \\8 ### \\9 ###
\\10### \\11### \\12### \\13### \\14### \\15### \\16",
page[headline.index])
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2  
This question looks exactly same as this one here stackoverflow.com/questions/1400937/… –  Narendra Yadala Nov 30 '11 at 6:00
    
@NarendraYadala -- However, the accepted answer to that question is more or less incorrect. R did not at that time support named groups at all, and even now they are not supported for use by gsub(). –  Josh O'Brien Nov 30 '11 at 7:59

2 Answers 2

According to ?regexp, named capture has been available in regexpr() and gregexpr() since R-2.14.0. Unfortunately, it is not yet available for sub() or, it turns out, gsub(). So, it may still be useful to you, but will probably require a bit more legwork than you might have hoped.

(For a few examples of naming groups in action, see the examples section of ?regexpr.)

ADDED LATER, FOLLOWING GREG SNOW'S ANSWER

Greg Snow alluded to the possibility of doing this with the gsubfn package. Here's an example that shows that gsubfn() can indeed handle more than nine backreferences:

require(gsubfn)
string <- "1:2:3:4:5:6:7:8:9:10:11"
pat <- "^(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+:(\\d)+"
gsubfn(pat, ~ paste(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,k,j,i,h,g,f,e,d,c,e,a), string)  
# [1] "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 5 1"
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You might consider using gsubfn from the gsubfn package instead of gsub, it gives more options on how to create your replacement.

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+1 -- Thanks for the pointer. I've added an example of its use to my answer, showing that it can indeed handle more than 9 backreferences. –  Josh O'Brien Dec 1 '11 at 4:39

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