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I have code that I want to look like this:

List<Type> Os;

...

foreach (Type o in Os)
    if (o.cond)
        return;  // Quitting early is important for my case!
    else
        Os.Remove(o);

... // Other code

This doesn't work, because you cannot remove from the list when you are inside a foreach loop over that list:

Is there a common way to solve the problem?

I can switch to a different type if needed.

Option 2:

List<Type> Os;

...

while (Os.Count != 0)
     if (Os[0].cond)
         return;
     else
         Os.RemoveAt(0);

... // Other code

Ugly, but it should work.

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16 Answers 16

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Do you really need to do this within a foreach loop?

This will achieve the same results as your examples, ie, remove all items from the list up until the first item that matches the condition (or remove all items if none of them match the condition).

int index = Os.FindIndex(x => x.cond);

if (index > 0)
    Os.RemoveRange(0, index);
else if (index == -1)
    Os.Clear();
share|improve this answer
    
I like that solution, I'll have to think about how it interacts with my details. –  BCS May 6 '09 at 23:41

You should never remove anything from a collection you are iterating over while inside of a foreach loop. It's basically like sawing the branch you are sitting on.

Use your while alternative. It is the way to go.

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1  
Yup, and .NET's kinda brutal about it when you try and alter the List (it throws) –  BCS May 6 '09 at 22:51
32  
+1 for the sawing-off-branch metaphor. Very nice. –  Carl Manaster May 6 '09 at 22:57
    
can't stop replying you "sawing off ...". very good metaphor –  DayDayHappy Aug 28 '12 at 10:16

You can iterate through the list backwards:

for (int i = myList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    if (whatever) myList.RemoveAt(i);
}


In response to your comment about wanting to quit when you find an item that you're NOT removing, then just using a while loop would be the best solution.

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I think the first and second example show that the writer doesn't care about the order of the items. –  Ethan Heilman May 6 '09 at 22:58
4  
He iterates backward to keep a correct index "i" into the list. If you iterate forward, you need to backtrack once (i--) for every removal to avoid skipping items. –  Lucas May 6 '09 at 23:11
    
doesn't work, I want to quit as soon as I find something that isn't to be removed. Aside from that minor point +1 –  BCS May 6 '09 at 23:34
    
This is a good way to remove elements in a list, but in this case it doesn't work because BCS needs to remove from the start, until a condition is met. –  Meta-Knight May 6 '09 at 23:36
    
Yeah, I missed that in his question. The while loop is the way to go. –  Jon B May 6 '09 at 23:44

I am a Java programmer, but something like this works:

List<Type> Os;
List<Type> Temp;
...
foreach (Type o in Os)
    if (o.cond)
        Temp.add(o);
Os.removeAll(Temp);  
share|improve this answer
    
I like this - it's cleaner than the backwards iteration solution. –  Cristi Diaconescu Mar 3 '10 at 14:57
    
My first thought was just like that. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Jan 13 '13 at 21:29
    
Great! Was looking for just this type of thing. –  Dave Baghdanov Mar 27 '13 at 21:08
    
Nice one. Thanks !! –  Naren Apr 5 '13 at 7:33
1  
Unless you work with tiny collections, this is inefficient. Whereas Jon B's solution is O(n), this one would be O(2n + m), where m is the number of matching items. I say would be, because it does not even work in .net. There is no List<T>.RemoveAll(ICollection<T>) like there is in Java. Take a look at @dirkgently's solution.Unfortunately RemoveAll does not return the removed elements, say as an IEnumerable<T>. –  Eugene Beresovksy Nov 28 '13 at 5:39

I just had that problem with my analysis library. I tried this:

for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
{                
   if (/*condition*/)
   {
       list.RemoveAt(i);
       i--;
   }
}

It's pretty simple but I haven't thought of any breaking point.

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good generic solution +1, could have optimized for this specific case –  Lucas May 6 '09 at 23:45
 Os.RemoveAll(delegate(int x) { return /// });
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How does that help? I want o remove only up to the first failed instance. –  BCS May 6 '09 at 22:53
1  
Why'd you want a foreach then? Use List.Remove() if all you are bothered about is the first item. Also, the return statements in your sample code look ominous: you'd return without removing the first incorrect item, if it is not the first item in the list. Is that what you want? –  dirkgently May 6 '09 at 22:58
    
Also, can you tell me how this is any different from the top answer? –  dirkgently May 6 '09 at 23:00
    
It's not. I don't think Jon B answers the question either ;-) –  Meta-Knight May 6 '09 at 23:32
    
What I want is to remove items from the list that fit come condition and quit as soon as I find an item that doesn't. –  BCS May 6 '09 at 23:36

Here is the EASIEST SOLUTION with the simpliest WHY

PROBLEM:

Typically, we are removing from the original list, this produces the problem of maintaining the list count and iterator location.

List<Type> Os = ....;
Os.ForEach(
    delegate(Type o) {
        if(!o.cond) Os.Remove(o);
    }
);

SOLUTION - LINQ.ForEach:

Note all I've added was ToList(). This creates a new list that you perform ForEach on, therefore you can remove your original list, yet keep iterating through the entire list.

List<Type> Os = ....;
Os.ToList().ForEach(
    delegate(Type o) {
        if(!o.cond) Os.Remove(o);
    }
);

SOLUTION - Regular foreach:

This technique also works for regular foreach statements.

List<Type> Os = ....;
foreach(Type o in Os.ToList()) {
  if(!o.cond) Os.Remove(o);
}

Please note, that this solution won't work if your original List contains struct element.

share|improve this answer
    
Syntactic sugar aside, that's the same as Nik's solution: copy the list, iterate the copy and modify the original. –  BCS Feb 21 '12 at 17:14
1  
+1 I like your clean solution! –  MUG4N Apr 29 '12 at 14:22
    
+1 Clean and prettily formatted. I'd like to read more such answers here on SO. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Jan 13 '13 at 21:32

I know you asked for something else, but if you want to conditionally remove a bunch of elements you can use lambda expression:

Os.RemoveAll(o => !o.cond);
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I'd try finding the index of first item that does not satisfy the predicate and do RemoveRange(0, index) on it. If nothing else, there should be less Remove calls.

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it's a detail but, evaluating cond has side effects and I /must/ remove items that pass. –  BCS May 6 '09 at 23:46
    
Isn't that the same solution as Luke? –  Meta-Knight May 7 '09 at 13:56

Update: Added for completeness

As several have answered, you shouldn't modify a collection while iterating it with GetEnumerator() (example foreach). The framework prevent you from doing this by throwing an exception. The generic colution to this is to iterate "manually" with for (see other answers). Be careful with your index so you don't skip items or re-evaluate the same one twice (by using i-- or iterating backward).

However, for your specific case, we can optimize the remove operation(s)... original answer below.


If what you want is to remove all items until one meets a given condition (that's what your code does), you can do this:

bool exitCondition;

while(list.Count > 0 && !(exitCondition = list[0].Condition))
   list.RemoveAt(0);

Or if you want to use a single remove operation:

SomeType exitCondition;
int index = list.FindIndex(i => i.Condition);

if(index < 0)
    list.Clear();
else
{
    exitCondition = list[0].State;
    list.RemoveRange(0, count);
}

Note: since I'm assuming that item.Condition is bool, I'm using item.State to save the exit condition.

Update: added bounds checking and saving exit condition to both examples

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The while loop will run out of bounds but that's easy to fix. Also I'd need a check after it to know what the termination condition was. –  BCS May 6 '09 at 23:44
    
@Lucas, Your second example should also handle the case where no items match the condition, ie, where FindIndex returns -1. –  LukeH May 6 '09 at 23:46
1  
it was just sample code, but i will add bounds checking, thanks :) –  Lucas May 6 '09 at 23:49

If you know your list isn't very large you can use

foreach (Type o in new List<Type>(Os))
    ....

which will create a temporary duplicate of the list. Your remove() call will then not be interfering with the iterator.

share|improve this answer
    
O(n) copy + O(n^2) removes. (Remove(T) is O(n) and I'd do up to n of them) –  BCS May 6 '09 at 22:56
    
Yeah repeated calls to remove() will never win any awards for performance (and will totally dwarf the list copy cost), though it would 'look' similar to how you want it (as you asked). RemoveRange() is your best bet for performance. –  Nik May 6 '09 at 23:08

Look at Enumerable.SkipWhile()

Enumerable.SkipWhile( x => condition).ToList()

Generally not mutating a list, makes live a lot easier. :)

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+1 Functional style positively comes with elegance included. –  Cristi Diaconescu Nov 28 '13 at 8:29

There is a good discussion of this in Removing items in a list while iterating through it .

They propose:

for(int i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
    int elementToRemove = list.Find(<Predicate to find the element>);

    list.Remove(elementToRemove);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide an example? –  Neil Barnwell May 6 '09 at 23:03
    
A little overly general (and it needs a check for a failed Find) –  BCS May 6 '09 at 23:40
1  
@BCS Only if the list type is non-nullable, neither Find or Remove break on failure, (though calling Remove when the item isn't there is unnecessarily expensive) –  rmoore Jul 3 '09 at 16:42

you can do it with linq

MyList = MyList.Where(x=>(someCondition(x)==true)).ToList()
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Anzurio's solution is probably the most straightforward, but here's another clean one, if you don't mind adding a bunch of interfaces/classes to your utilities library.

You can write it like this

List<Type> Os;
...
var en = Os.GetRemovableEnumerator();
while (en.MoveNext())
{
    if (en.Current.Cond)
        en.Remove();
}

Put the following infrastructure, inspired by Java's Iterator<T>.remove, into your utility library:

static class Extensions
{
    public static IRemovableEnumerator<T> GetRemovableEnumerator<T>(this IList<T> l)
    {
        return new ListRemovableEnumerator<T>(l);
    }
}

interface IRemovableEnumerator<T> : IEnumerator<T>
{
    void Remove();
}

class ListRemovableEnumerator<T> : IRemovableEnumerator<T>
{
    private readonly IList<T> _list;
    private int _count;
    private int _index;
    public ListRemovableEnumerator(IList<T> list)
    {
        _list = list;
        _count = list.Count;
        _index = -1;
    }

    private void ThrowOnModification()
    {
        if (_list.Count != _count)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("List was modified after creation of enumerator");
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        ThrowOnModification();
        if (_index + 1 == _count)
            return false;
        _index++;
        return true;
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        ThrowOnModification();
        _index = -1;
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get { return Current; }
    }

    public T Current
    {
        get { return _list[_index]; }
    }

    public void Remove()
    {
        ThrowOnModification();
        _list.RemoveAt(_index);
        _index--;
        _count--;
    }
}
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I just had the same problem and solved it by using the following:

foreach (Type o in (new List(Os))) { if (something) Os.Remove(o); }

It iterates through a copy of the list and removes from the original list.

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