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I have a input file coming into my application with some product prices values in each rows.

However, when the price is higher then 999.99, the values contain , at appropriate place.

1,000.00
5,432.89

etc.

1) Is there a set rule about placing comma in currency values ? On what basis the place of comma is decided ?

2) Is there a library method to parse such string values to float/double ?

Thanks for reading!!

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what about this docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/formatting.html –  nidhin Nov 30 '11 at 6:12
    
Any reason for using float/double instead of BigDecimal, which is much more appropriate for prices? –  Jon Skeet Nov 30 '11 at 6:13
    
@Jon Skeet: Yes.. Using big decimal in the app!! but following KISS for stack overflow!! –  Vicky Nov 30 '11 at 6:19
    
@nidhin: How does that help ?? –  Vicky Nov 30 '11 at 6:22
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use DecimalFormat to parse and format decimal numbers.

The commas are there for thousands separators. Here's a simple example which deliberately parses to BigDecimal rather than to float or double - binary floating point is inappropriate for currency values.

import java.math.*;
import java.text.*;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        DecimalFormat format = new DecimalFormat();
        format.setParseBigDecimal(true);
        BigDecimal value = (BigDecimal) format.parse("1,234.56");
        System.out.println(value);
    }
}

Now that just uses the default locale for things like the thousands separator and the decimal separator - you may well want to specify a particular locale, if you know what will be used for the file you need to parse.

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Can you please elaborate a bit more on locale ?? How does it affect the formatting ? –  Vicky Nov 30 '11 at 6:26
    
@NikunjChauhan: Different cultures use different ways of displaying numbers. For example, the number "one and a half" may be written as 1.5 in English but 1,5 in French. –  Jon Skeet Nov 30 '11 at 6:31
    
Oh!! got it!! Thanks.. –  Vicky Nov 30 '11 at 6:33
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