Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I implemented a simple method to generate Cartesian product on several Seqs like this:

object RichSeq {
  implicit def toRichSeq[T](s: Seq[T]) = new RichSeq[T](s)
}

class RichSeq[T](s: Seq[T]) {

  import RichSeq._

  def cartesian(ss: Seq[Seq[T]]): Seq[Seq[T]] = {

    ss.toList match {
      case Nil        => Seq(s)
      case s2 :: Nil  => {
        for (e <- s) yield s2.map(e2 => Seq(e, e2))
      }.flatten
      case s2 :: tail => {
        for (e <- s) yield s2.cartesian(tail).map(seq => e +: seq)
      }.flatten
    }
  }
}

Obviously, this one is really slow, as it calculates the whole product at once. Did anyone implement a lazy solution for this problem in Scala?

UPD

OK, So I implemented a reeeeally stupid, but working version of an iterator over a Cartesian product. Posting here for future enthusiasts:

object RichSeq {
  implicit def toRichSeq[T](s: Seq[T]) = new RichSeq(s) 
}

class RichSeq[T](s: Seq[T]) {

  def lazyCartesian(ss: Seq[Seq[T]]): Iterator[Seq[T]] = new Iterator[Seq[T]] {

    private[this] val seqs = s +: ss

    private[this] var indexes = Array.fill(seqs.length)(0)

    private[this] val counts = Vector(seqs.map(_.length - 1): _*)

    private[this] var current = 0

    def next(): Seq[T] = {
      val buffer = ArrayBuffer.empty[T]
      if (current != 0) {
        throw new NoSuchElementException("no more elements to traverse")
      }
      val newIndexes = ArrayBuffer.empty[Int]
      var inside = 0
      for ((index, i) <- indexes.zipWithIndex) {
        buffer.append(seqs(i)(index))
        newIndexes.append(index)
        if ((0 to i).forall(ind => newIndexes(ind) == counts(ind))) {
          inside = inside + 1
        }
      }
      current = inside
      if (current < seqs.length) {
        for (i <- (0 to current).reverse) {
          if ((0 to i).forall(ind => newIndexes(ind) == counts(ind))) {
            newIndexes(i) = 0
          } else if (newIndexes(i) < counts(i)) {
            newIndexes(i) = newIndexes(i) + 1
          }
        }
        current = 0
        indexes = newIndexes.toArray
      }
      buffer.result()
    }

    def hasNext: Boolean = current != seqs.length
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Instead of implementing a lazy product by hand, try reusing Scala's lazy collections (Streams and Views) - see below for links to examples. –  Blaisorblade Dec 19 '11 at 2:01
    
Thanks for accepting my solution, would you also please upvote it? –  Blaisorblade Dec 21 '11 at 16:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here's my solution to the given problem. Note that the laziness is simply caused by using .view on the "root collection" of the used for comprehension.

scala> def combine[A](xs: Traversable[Traversable[A]]): Seq[Seq[A]] =
     |  xs.foldLeft(Seq(Seq.empty[A])){
     |    (x, y) => for (a <- x.view; b <- y) yield a :+ b }
combine: [A](xs: Traversable[Traversable[A]])Seq[Seq[A]]
scala> combine(Set(Set("a","b","c"), Set("1","2"), Set("S","T"))) foreach (println(_))
List(a, 1, S)
List(a, 1, T)
List(a, 2, S)
List(a, 2, T)
List(b, 1, S)
List(b, 1, T)
List(b, 2, S)
List(b, 2, T)
List(c, 1, S)
List(c, 1, T)
List(c, 2, S)
List(c, 2, T)

To obtain this, I started from the function combine defined in http://stackoverflow.com/a/4515071/53974, passing it the function (a, b) => (a, b). However, that didn't quite work directly, since that code expects a function of type (A, A) => A. So I just adapted the code a bit.

share|improve this answer

These might be a starting point:

share|improve this answer
    
Note that some of the answer of "Expand a Set[Set[String]] into Cartesian Product in Scala" are also lazy, and take much less code than above. –  Blaisorblade Dec 19 '11 at 2:00

You can look here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/8318364/312172 how to translate a number into an index of all possible values, without generating every element.

This technique can be used to implement a stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that Scala already implements both Stream and Views! –  Blaisorblade Dec 19 '11 at 2:00
    
... for Cartesian Product? –  user unknown Dec 19 '11 at 5:12
    
You can define the cartesian product using existing operators on collections; if you convert collection to views, the construction will be lazy. See my answer below. –  Blaisorblade Dec 20 '11 at 0:03

What about:

  def cartesian[A](list: List[Seq[A]]): Iterator[Seq[A]] = {
    if (list.isEmpty) {
      Iterator(Seq())
    } else {
      list.head.iterator.flatMap { i => cartesian(list.tail).map(i +: _) }
    }
  }

Simple and lazy ;)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.