Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just read this requirement on a job listing:

Aware of the pitfalls of code like: User.find(:all).each

I knew instantly that I was unqualified for the job because for the life of me, I don't understand what the problem is. Is it...

  • design related? Should I store the database request in a variable and then iterate over it?
  • dangerous?
  • too wordy? Should I use User.all.each instead? (-1 word! w00t!)
  • simply poorly worded? Should it be prefaced with "The users table happens to have 3 million rows"?
share|improve this question
1  
Funny thing is that I came here after seeing this job posting too –  dolzenko Jun 3 '09 at 8:18
    
I took an interview at a company with the same requirement. I was indeed unqualified for the position. I knew that from the onset, but I trudged on anyway intrigued by his questions. I have never had a phone interview where I've been drilled like that. Kudos to the guy for knowing exactly what we wants, but change your posting to reflect that! –  MediaJunkie Jun 26 '09 at 0:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think the "pitfall" they are looking for is that when someone writes User.all.each, it usually looks like this:

User.all.each do |u|
    next if !u.is_active
    ...
end

meaning that the filtering is happening in Ruby, after having loaded the entire contents of each of those objects from the DB, when the filtering could have been done much more efficiently by expressing the desired property as part of the query.

share|improve this answer
    
golly, there are things below a level of common sense that I can't even begin to consider. –  kch May 6 '09 at 23:11
    
I mean, who would use next when one can use reject/select? LOLZ. –  kch May 6 '09 at 23:11
    
@kch agreed! The lack of clarification made me think it must be something VERY deep . . . LOL –  BushyMark May 6 '09 at 23:19
    
As an additional note, it also loads all columns for each row/User, maybe even some that you don't need. (This includes creating even more objects for associations to other tables) –  Cristian Vat May 7 '09 at 4:11

Doing User.all will load in all the user records. If you have 3 million records, it will load in all 3 million objects. This is why it is a bad idea. It's best to filter down your SQL using methods like pagination or conditions to return the smallest subset needed to "get the job done"

share|improve this answer

Is it wordy? You can do the same with User.all.each ? (-1 word! w00t!)

We do appreciate brevity in the land of ruby. I, for one, vote for implementing Model.each, now that you made me consider it.

Is it simply poorly worded? Should it be prefaced with "The users table happens to have 3 million rows"

I believe this is the most reasonable answer. You may be loading a lot of records into memory.

I'd say the problem is not so much that the users table happens to have 3m records, but that it may come to have them within a reasonable timeframe.

share|improve this answer
    
- We do appreciate brevity in the land of ruby. I, for one, vote for implementing Model.each, now that you made me consider it. me <-- pwned! –  BushyMark May 6 '09 at 23:22

It's a pitfall, I'm not a native English speaker, but my understanding is that it's not an immediate drawback, but it's a hole in the ground you should be wary of. Doing it like this is future proof:

User.find_in_batches do |group|
  group.each do |user|
    user.do_something
  end
end

Even if you grow from 1 user to 10 million in a week.

share|improve this answer
    
you can also use User.find_each to achieve the same basic effect as find_in_batches, I think.. –  hank42 Mar 4 '13 at 8:23

Well, if you want to sound smart, you answer is: There is no pitfall to that question, assuming that you want to modify or display values from each and every one of the user objects. :-)

share|improve this answer
1  
No, even then you should get them in batches. –  Walt Gordon Jones May 7 '09 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.