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I am trying to add entries to an hashtable in Java using Eclipse. During the put operation, only one of the key gets overwriten by a new key and value. The count of the hashtable is maintained properly but one of the (key,value) pair is lost.

Here is my sample code:

ArrayList<Double> list;
Hashtable<Val,ArrayList<Double>> numbers = new Hashtable<Val,ArrayList<Double>>();

while((line = brMyHashval.readLine()) != null)
{
    if(!(line.isEmpty()))
    {               
        String[] temp;
        temp = line.split(" ");      
        eDouble = Double.parseDouble(temp[2].toString());

        Val key = new Val(Double.parseDouble(temp[0].toString()) ,Double.parseDouble(temp[1].toString()) );

        if(!(numbers.containsKey(key)))
        {
            list = new ArrayList<Double>();
            numbers.put(key, list);

        }
        else
        {
            list = numbers.get(key);
        }
        list.add(eDouble); 
     }
}

I have used to inbuilt 'hashcode' and 'equals' method in eclipse for comparing class objects.

Input Text File:

1.0 2.0 9.0
3.0 4.0 9.0
5.0 6.0 9.0
1.0 2.0 8.0
5.0 6.0 8.0
1.0 2.0 7.0
**7.0 8.0 7.0** // After this point a new hash entry gets added for key(7,8), But key (1,2) get deleted from the hashtable, though count gets increased to 4.
3.0 4.0 7.0
5.0 6.0 10.0
1.0 2.0 10.0
1.0 3.0 10.0
1.0 4.0 10.0

Why does the key get deleted at that specific instant.?

[edit] hashcode and equals: I used eclipse to automatically import these methods // (x,y) is (a,b)

  class Val

{
    double x;
    double y;

Val(double X, double Y)
{
    x = X;
    y = Y;
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    long temp;
    temp = Double.doubleToLongBits(x);
    result = prime * result + (int) (temp ^ (temp >>> 32));
    temp = Double.doubleToLongBits(y);
    result = prime * result + (int) (temp ^ (temp >>> 32));
    return result;
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    Val other = (Val) obj;
    if (Double.doubleToLongBits(x) != Double.doubleToLongBits(other.x))
        return false;
    if (Double.doubleToLongBits(y) != Double.doubleToLongBits(other.y))
        return false;
    return true;
}

}

share|improve this question
2  
What do your hashCode and equals do? –  Thilo Nov 30 '11 at 7:07
    
What is the "Val" class? Is it the same as "K"? –  dmeister Nov 30 '11 at 7:45
    
Yeah. sorry. Val class is class K –  SyncMaster Nov 30 '11 at 7:47
    
I can not reproduce, it works the way you describe yoo want it to work here, all keys get created once. Can you post a SSCCE? You use both class K and class Val, I don't think the code yo show is the one you run. –  Roger Lindsjö Nov 30 '11 at 7:50
1  
The problem is not the debugger, it is HOW the data is stored in the HashMap - see my answer –  Carlos Heuberger Nov 30 '11 at 10:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are using the debugger to check the contents of the HashMap.

I assume that both the keys (1,2) and (7,8) are saved in the same slot of the HashTable used to save the keys. As (7,8) get added, (1,2) is moved to the "back" of (7,8) - you must check the next entry of the (7,8) entry.

enter image description here

add the following to the end of your code to see what is really in the HashMap:

    for (Val key : numbers.keySet()) {
        System.out.printf("%.1f %.1f: %s%n", key.x, key.y, numbers.get(key));
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Good catch that using a debugger to inspect a HashMap might not be intuitive. –  Roger Lindsjö Nov 30 '11 at 14:10

Sumindra above means that is you want to use a custom class as a key in a Map, you must have the equals() and hashCode() methods written as specified. Do following (for instance:

public boolean equals(K other) {
    return a == other.a && b == other.b;
}

public int hashCode() {
    return new Double(a).hashCode() ^ new Double(b).hashCode();
}

this guarantees that:

  • two K objects retuyrn equal if they have the same members
  • two K objects have the same hashCode if they have the same members

Which is a requirement for Map key objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Even with the code you mentioned, the same problem happens. i.e. two K objects return equal for different members. Should I write the method differently.? I could not find any reason why it gives same values for different members even when using ^ –  SyncMaster Nov 30 '11 at 8:33
1  
@SyncMaster beware that two objects can return the same hashCode and still be different! For example Strings can have much more bits than the hash code, it would be impossible to great unique codes for every String. In your case, two doubles have more bits than long (the hashCode return type) –  Carlos Heuberger Nov 30 '11 at 9:44
    
@CarlosHeuberger : So the better way to handle such cases is writing my own appropriate hashcode ? –  SyncMaster Nov 30 '11 at 10:02
    
@SyncMaster - there is no need and in most cases no way to have an unique hash code. In your case, where the key is defined by 2 doubles, that is 2 times 64 bits, you would need at least 128 bits to have an unique hash code. In Java the hash code is only a long with 32 bits, no way to uniquely represent 128 bits! –  Carlos Heuberger Nov 30 '11 at 22:23

I can not reproduce your problem, this is the EXACT code I'm running (not simplified as the other answers to make it as close as possible to your original question).

public class HashProblem {

    public static class Val {
        private double x;
        private double y;

        public Val(double x, double y) {
            this.x = x;
            this.y = y;
        }

        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            final int prime = 31;
            int result = 1;
            long temp;
            temp = Double.doubleToLongBits(x);
            result = prime * result + (int) (temp ^ (temp >>> 32));
            temp = Double.doubleToLongBits(y);
            result = prime * result + (int) (temp ^ (temp >>> 32));
            return result;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                return true;
            if (obj == null)
                return false;
            if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
                return false;
            Val other = (Val) obj;
            if (Double.doubleToLongBits(x) != Double.doubleToLongBits(other.x))
                return false;
            if (Double.doubleToLongBits(y) != Double.doubleToLongBits(other.y))
                return false;
            return true;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
        ArrayList<Double> list;
        String line;
        BufferedReader brMyHashval = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream("HashProblem.txt")));
        Hashtable<Val, ArrayList<Double>> numbers = new Hashtable<Val, ArrayList<Double>>();

        while ((line = brMyHashval.readLine()) != null) {
            if (!(line.isEmpty())) {
                String[] temp;
                temp = line.split(" ");
                Double eDouble = Double.parseDouble(temp[2].toString());

                Val key = new Val(Double.parseDouble(temp[0].toString()), Double.parseDouble(temp[1].toString()));

                if (!(numbers.containsKey(key))) {
                    list = new ArrayList<Double>();
                    numbers.put(key, list);
                    System.err.println("Created " + key.x + " " + key.y);
                } else {
                    list = numbers.get(key);
                }
                list.add(eDouble);
                System.err.println("Inserted into " + key.x + " " + key.y + " value " + eDouble + " size " + list.size() + " " + list);
            }
        }
    }

The output I get from the logging is

Created 1.0 2.0
Inserted into 1.0 2.0 value 9.0 size 1 [9.0] 
Created 3.0 4.0
Inserted into 3.0 4.0 value 9.0 size 1 [9.0]
Created 5.0 6.0
Inserted into 5.0 6.0 value 9.0 size 1 [9.0]
Inserted into 1.0 2.0 value 8.0 size 2 [9.0, 8.0]
Inserted into 5.0 6.0 value 8.0 size 2 [9.0, 8.0]
Inserted into 1.0 2.0 value 7.0 size 3 [9.0, 8.0, 7.0]
Created 7.0 8.0
Inserted into 7.0 8.0 value 7.0 size 1 [7.0]
Inserted into 3.0 4.0 value 7.0 size 2 [9.0, 7.0]
Inserted into 5.0 6.0 value 10.0 size 3 [9.0, 8.0, 10.0]
Inserted into 1.0 2.0 value 10.0 size 4 [9.0, 8.0, 7.0, 10.0]
Created 1.0 3.0
Inserted into 1.0 3.0 value 10.0 size 1 [10.0]
Created 1.0 4.0
Inserted into 1.0 4.0 value 10.0 size 1 [10.0]

Isn't that what you'd expect?

The other answers has good points about simplifying your hashCode and equals. Also, you do not need to do toString() on object that are already strings.

share|improve this answer

Make sure the hash and equals are meet their requirements.

There should be a unique hash to each instance and equals should be true if they are only equal. False positives mean that the false positive values map to the same key. See this link.

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