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typedef struct node{
    char one;
    char two;
    struct node *next;
} nodea;

I'm thinking in terms of compiler padding, is there any way I can make the sizeof(nodea) smaller than 16?

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I think with tightest packing, you'll end up with 8 bytes for the pointer and 2 bytes for the characters... but not 100% sure. Look at #pragmas for your compiler that affect structure packing, pick the one that provides tightest packing, and try sizeof(). –  Eric J. Nov 30 '11 at 7:26
    
On what platform, 32bit or 64bit, what compiler (version)? –  tristopia Nov 30 '11 at 9:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the #pragma pack compiler directive http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2e70t5y1%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

 #pragma pack(push)
 #pragma pack(1)
 typedef struct node {
    char one;
    char two;
    struct node* next;
 } nodea;
 #pragma pack(pop)
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Forgot to mention, I'm using gcc –  jck Nov 30 '11 at 7:27
    
Should be almost identical on gcc. See gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Structure_002dPacking-Pragmas.html –  Eric J. Nov 30 '11 at 7:29
3  
Remember that using this structure for a linked list would decrease the overall performance of the list, since the address of the next node isn't aligned. Try to place the struct node *next as first item of the struct. So the address would always be aligned and it can be fetched in one instruction / leased cycles possible. –  DipSwitch Nov 30 '11 at 8:04
1  
Note that when allocating memory with malloc, you will always get aligned blocks, so if you do 10 mallocs of 10 bytes each you will still use 160 bytes of heap space even with #pragma pack. Allocating an array of 10 structs will only use up 104 bytes with #pragma pack compared to 160 bytes without it. –  Klas Lindbäck Nov 30 '11 at 9:57

Unless it's something unconventional, it can be packed into 1+1+8=10 bytes. If pointers have to be aligned, then 16 bytes. If you put the pointer first and chars next, then 10 bytes, but the alignment requirements may still make it 16 when you make an array of these structs.

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You can make it 10 bytes if you pack it, assuming the underlying hardware does not have any particular alignment requirements. Be aware that once you start packing you are leaving portability behind.

How to affect packing depends on your compiler but most compilers, including gcc, support #pragma pack type directives.

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This is compiler dependant. Usually you can control the alignment of the structure fields/variables. For example, with gcc you could use

typedef struct __attribute__ ((packed)) node {
    char one;
    char two;
    struct node *next;
} nodea;

to get 10 for sizeof(nodea) on 64-bit platform.

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Always pack the whole struct and not just a variable in the struct. typedef struct __attribute__ ((packed)) node { ... –  DipSwitch Nov 30 '11 at 7:44
    
It was just an example from GNU documentation. And "always" everything depends on task, isn't it? –  praetorian droid Nov 30 '11 at 8:03
    
Normally you would pack the whole struct since this is easier to read. Further more is it harder to predict the struct size (someone would need to think harder) to determent the end struct size. Also if you add one char after the node entry this would still again use 8 bytes for that single char, since this is the word size of the processor. Which could also lead to some undefined behaviorism if you for example want to read a stored data file which has be generated on a 64bit architecture and is read on a 32bit architecture. –  DipSwitch Nov 30 '11 at 8:10
    
Ok, I agree that this is better practice in most cases. And of course, aligning structure fields instead of the structure itself is needed only if it applied exactly to fields, not to entire structure. Anyway, I updated my answer to provide best and common practice, offered by you. –  praetorian droid Nov 30 '11 at 11:41

Using packed on a struct would also mean that the compiler can't reorder the data structure, on some platforms packing can have huge performance decrease. Some processors can't get unaligned words so if the code would be compiled on that platform the compiler would be forced to get the word per byte and shift everything in the right place, this is definitely something you don't want. Especially not on a linked list since this would make your list really really really slow to access... And even if the cpu supports unaligned getting the CPU would need to make extra cycles to read from 2 addresses in memory and concat them again.

This is why you have to look at how you can help the compiler. You would want you struct to be word aligned so the address of the next node can always be read with one single read instruction. This would mean for a 64bit architecture you would want to place the pointer of the next node on top so this would always be aligned, next you would want to make sure that if you use the struct's in an array the address of struct node * would always be aligned, so you need to make sure that your final struct size is a multiple of 8 bytes. This would mean you can ether add 6 more elements or you can chose a larger data type.

This would mean you would get something like this:

typedef struct __attribute__((packed)) node {
    struct node *next;
    char data[8];
} nodea;

typedef struct __attribute__((packed)) node {
    struct node *next;
    uint16_t data[4];
} nodea;

typedef struct __attribute__((packed)) node {
    struct node *next;
    uint32_t data[2];
} nodea;

etc. etc. etc.

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