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>>> b = []
>>> c = '1234'
>>> b += c
>>> b
['1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> 

What is happening here ? This should not work, right ? or am I missing something obvious?

>>> b = []
>>> c = '1234'
>>> b + c
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#7>", line 1, in <module>
    b + c
TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "str") to list
>>> 

Then a += b is not always equivalent to a = a + b ?

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1  
Is this behaviour still present in Python 3.x? I always found it irritating that a standard library type breaks the general contract that a += b <=> a = a + b (without affecting any other references to the original a value). –  Karl Knechtel Nov 30 '11 at 9:01
2  
@Karl Knechtel: unfortunately, it's still present in Python 3.2.1. –  Cristian Ciupitu Nov 30 '11 at 9:16
    
I was checking it in python 3.2, yes. I found the issue looking at a beginner code that was producing wrong results. I could not find any reference to this specific behavior in Learning Python. I checked PEP203 and it says that __iadd__ is used but also they say that __iadd__ is the inplace __add__ that is not the case in this case... Maybe someone could explain the rational beneath this behavior or point/link to some discussion about that? I understand from Karl's comment that there is people concerned about it –  joaquin Nov 30 '11 at 10:28
    
oh! anonymous downvoter!, could you share with me your criticism ? Lets learn something together. –  joaquin Jan 6 '12 at 13:07

7 Answers 7

Strings are iterable: the elements are the string's characters. When you add an iterable to a list, the iterable's elements get appended to the list.

Either of the following will do what you're expecting (i.e. append the string, not extend the list with the string's characters):

b += [c]

or

b.append(c)
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+1 for using the correct vocabulary: 'iterable' –  gecco Nov 30 '11 at 9:34

The += operator extends a list instead of appending to it:

>>> b = []
>>> c = "1234"
>>> b.append(c)
>>> b
['1234']
>>> b.extend(c)
>>> b
['1234', '1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> b += c
>>> b
['1234', '1', '2', '3', '4', '1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> b += [c]
>>> b
['1234', '1', '2', '3', '4', '1', '2', '3', '4', '1234']
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do you know a source of documentation on the effect of these operators (+, +=) for iterables/sequences/... ? –  moooeeeep Nov 30 '11 at 8:33

This is an answer not to the original question (which I think has been adequately answered), but to the numerous questions that have been asked in the comments about the semantics of augmented assignment (+= and similar operations).

In a nutshell: Augmented assignment works differently for mutable types than for immutable ones.

str, tuple, and the numeric types, among others, are immutable. The contents of a tuple cannot be changed once it has been created, so you get this behavior:

>>> a = (1, 2)
>>> b = a
>>> a += (3, 4)
>>> a
(1, 2, 3, 4)
>>> b
(1, 2)

str has the same semantics. Basically, a += b is equivalent to a = a + b if a is immutable.

Most other types, including list, are mutable. A list's contents can be changed in place, and augmented assignment does exactly that. Hence:

>>> a = [1, 2]
>>> b = a
>>> a += [3, 4]
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> b
[1, 2, 3, 4]

Whereas if the third line were replaced with a = a + [3, 4], a new list would be created and b would be [1, 2].

For a user-defined class, the semantics depend on how it was implemented, but this is how it's supposed to be done per PEP 203.

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This is a really good observation. a and b share the same memory address until a is evaluated on the left hand side of an assignment operator? Could you include that? –  Droogans Dec 28 '11 at 12:20

A string is a sequence of characters. The list operation += takes any sequence and appends each of the sequence's elements to the list.

(Actually += takes any iterable.)

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b = b + c fails –  joaquin Nov 30 '11 at 8:05
2  
+ is a different operator than +=. –  rob mayoff Nov 30 '11 at 8:07
    
I know, it is called augmented assigment and it is defined to be equivalent to a = a + b (see PEP203). Taking this definition strictly drive me to a wrong expectation. That is what surprised me (probably I never dared to add a list to a string in my python code so I never collided with this before). Should not be In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess ?. –  joaquin Nov 30 '11 at 10:22

+= is syntactic sugar for extend, but + is just list concatenation. If you extend, you'll iterate over the argument, which in this case is a string. But you can't concatenate a string to a list, hence + fails.

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What did you expect? If you want to add c as string you must to do:

b.append(c)

Cheers!

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I expected it to fail –  joaquin Nov 30 '11 at 8:11
    
But as Tim explained above the behavior of += is not the same that + –  ocell Nov 30 '11 at 8:26
    
please, see comment on Tim post. –  joaquin Nov 30 '11 at 10:34

In essence, the += operator on the list will retrieve c's iterator, which will yield the individual characters in order. If you intended to add the actual string to the list, yielding the result ['1234'], you can use b.append('1234') instead.

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