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Java I18n capability is amazing. Supported locales works perfect:

Locale ar = new Locale("ar","SA");
System.out.println(ar.getDisplayName(ar));

outputs: العربية (السعودية)

But for not supported locales like Kazakh language, language name is displayed in same lang will output in Enlish(Standard), as written in Java Spec.

Locale locale = new Locale("kk","KZ");
System.out.println(kk.getDisplayLanguage(kk));

outputs: Kazakh (Kazakhstan)

I'm trying to solve this problem, last code has to output like this: Қазақша (Қазақстан).

Anybody knows solution?

Any guesses (or ways to contact with Java SE developer, or with who know algorithms) I will note as answer ;)

Thank you!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that you run on Windows, you need to change the locale in the OS Regional Settings. Please see this link. (On win 2000 Kazakh appears, however, on win 7 it does not appear in the list...). On linux you can set the locale with the localedef utility.

Good Luck!

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Better late than never^^ –  Erko Dec 22 '13 at 11:56

The most obvious solution would be to provide the translations by yourself, that is to externalize the locale based on value of language and country properties and put these into i.e. ListResourceBundle instance. If this seems like a lot of work, it should... Other solution worth checking out is using ICU.
It won't give you Locale display name directly, but you can create ULocale object based on Locale and this might just be translated.
If the ICU trick won't work, you'd probably be forced to go through CLDR language list and provide the translations yourself. BTW. Serbian had exactly the same problem, I am not sure if they fixed it for JDK7...

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