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In C++ Primer Plus (2001, Czech Translation) I have found these different template specialization syntax:

function template

template <typename T> void foo(T);

specialization syntax

void foo(int param); // 1
void foo<int>(int param); // 2
template <> void foo<int>(int param); // 3
template <> void foo(int param); // 4
template void foo(int param); // 5

Googling a bit, I have found only No.3 examples. Is there any difference (in call, compiling, usage) among them? Are some of them obsolete/deprecated? Why not just use No.1?

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It either a bad translation or you just get it wrong. I suggest you to read more about difference between templates and function overloading. –  varepsilon Nov 30 '11 at 9:28
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It is a good idea to generally use (and think in ) the term "function template" as this emphasizes that it is a template, not a function, and that wherever a function is needed, you can't use a template (only a specialization, since those are functions then). –  PlasmaHH Nov 30 '11 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Here are comments with each syntax:

void foo(int param); //not a specialization, it is an overload

void foo<int>(int param); //ill-formed

//this form always works
template <> void foo<int>(int param); //explicit specialization

//same as above, but works only if template argument deduction is possible!
template <> void foo(int param); //explicit specialization

//same as above, but works only if template argument deduction is possible!
template void foo(int param); //explicit instantiation

Added by me:

//Notice <int>. This form always works!
template void foo<int>(int param); //explicit instantiation

//Notice <>. works only if template argument deduction is possible!
template void foo<>(int param); //explicit instantiation

From coding point of view, overload is preferred over function-template-specialization.

So, don't specialize function template:

And to know the terminologies:

  • instantiation
  • explicit instantiation
  • specialization
  • explicit specialization

See this :

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+1, with a note that the overload should probably be preferred. –  avakar Nov 30 '11 at 9:24
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@sehe: Added the link already in my answer. –  Nawaz Nov 30 '11 at 9:27
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The explicit instantiation should be template void foo<int>(int param), or template void foo<>(int param) when the template parameter is deduced. –  fefe Nov 30 '11 at 9:28
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Nicely framed answer :) –  Prasoon Saurav Nov 30 '11 at 9:29
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Your second last is not correct. that is a valid explicit specialization. doesnt need<> –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 30 '11 at 9:32

Using Visual Studio 2012, it seems to work slightly different if there's no function argument:

template <typename T> T bar( );
//template int bar<int>( ) { return 0; } doesn't work
template < > int bar<int>( ) { return 0; } //does work
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