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On Android 2.3.3 I'm doing a bulk import into one of my SQLite tables, using the API method:

SQLiteDatabase.insert(String table, String nullColumnHack, ContentValues values)

It works fine, but if there is a database error with any row (e.g. constraint error) a full stack trace is written to Android Logcat which quickly fills up.

How can I turn off this stack trace?

I already handle any Exception being thrown but the Logcat is being polluted from within the SQLite library code.

I am worried about performance on mobile devices.

  • transactions for import are enabled already
  • preloaded DB is impossible because data might change

Constraints should be enforced and I will handle violation, but 20 line stack traces in Logcat for each violation multiplied by hundreds of violations is what I want to turn off.

Unfortunately I also cannot use advanced conflict handling introduced with Android Froyo because app must also run on older devices.

Cheers.

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better is to fix the error itself maybe –  Caner Nov 30 '11 at 10:45
    
Meanwhile I found the solution, see my answer below. –  kasimir Nov 30 '11 at 23:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

OK, I just found the solution as follows:

I have to use a different API method (not SQLiteDatabase.insert()):

SQLiteDatabase.insertOrThrow(String table, String nullColumnHack, ContentValues values)

Now, the exception is thrown from the SQLite library, as expected and no stack trace is dumped.

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Just filter out any stuff you're not interested in, based on the tag or the process ID. You can do it easily in the Logcat viewer in Eclipse, or if you're using Logcat on the command line the instructions are here.

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Thanks, but as I said above I am worried about the performance on actual mobile devices, not in Eclipse. –  kasimir Nov 30 '11 at 13:45

It's not pollution. It's the purpose of LogCat to register everything that's going on on the device / emulator.

If you want to filter out your LogCat, it's possible in Eclipse (you can filter by log tag, by pid, or by log level), thus providing a way to "remove" unwanted exceptions from a LogCat window.

EDIT If the issue is performance (according to your comments), I don't think you should worry.

  • If you find bad performances, you'll gain A LOT more by enabling transactions on your batch insert.
  • Also, if it's to insert "starting data" for your application, have you considered shipping the apk with a pre-loaded database? Instead of inserting everything at run-time, you could just copy an existing database that you prepared yourself. No constraint problem anymore, and almost instant start for your users. Of course, if it's dynamic batch insert (based on user entry or external parameters defined at runtime), it's not possible.
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But I am worried about the performance on actual handsets. It surely costs time and resources to dump a complete stack trace to Logcat. I am talking about bulk import, hundreds of rows might violate constraints which I want to ignore. The way it behaves now, in that case hundreds of stack traces are written to Logcat, each stack trace consisting of 20 lines or so. –  kasimir Nov 30 '11 at 13:41
    
Just a thought: if you want to ignore the constraint, why do you have it in the first place? Surely if it's there, it's meant to be enforced, isn't it? But anyway, I don't think you should worry about performance impact on actual devices, unless you intend to run it on a phone from 1995 ;) –  Guillaume Nov 30 '11 at 13:52
    
Please also check the edited answer for performance hints. –  Guillaume Nov 30 '11 at 13:54
    
- transactions are enabled already - preloaded DB impossible because data might change Constraints should be enforced and I will handle violation, but 20 line stack traces in Logcat for each violation is what I want to turn off. –  kasimir Nov 30 '11 at 14:13
    
Well, arguably, if you have constraints in your db, then a violation of that constraint should crash your application –  Guillaume Nov 30 '11 at 14:34

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