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I'm using the jQuery library to have an ordered list with the ability to re-order items with drag and drop. I want to send the information of the order to the database and the next time you refresh the page (or load it on another browser/computer) it would have your order.

I have a table for each element of the list in mySQL and right now I'm ordering by the creation_date. So what is the best solution and where (and how) do I save the order?

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5 Answers 5

Here is a solution off the top of my head. It is untested but should point you in the right direction. Have an INT 'order' column in the table you want to sort.

The HTML/javascript (jquery-ui)

<!-- This is the list of items where the item's data base id is in the element
id, i.e. id="item-DATABASE_ID".  These items can be displayed with PHP by
SELECTing them from the database using ORDER BY order ASC -->
<ul id="sortable">
    <li id="item-1">Foo</li>
    <li id="item-2">Bar</li>
    <li id="item-3">Baz</li>
</ul>

<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
    // This turns the list into a jquery UI sortable list
    $("#sortable").sortable({
        // This even fires whenever the list is changed
        change: function(event, ui) {
            // This sends the list data to an  AJAX handler
            $.post({
                url: 'path_to_ajax_handler.php',
                // The serialize function transforms the list information
                // into a query string i.e.: item[]=1&item[]=2&item[]=3
                data: $('#sortable').sortable("serialize")
            });
        }
    });
});
</script>

The PHP

<?php
// The IDs of the items to be sorted are passed to the AJAX handler in the order
// they are listed in the page
if (isset($_POST['item']))
{
    $items = (array)$_POST['item'];

    // This updates all the items in the table with the correct order
    for ($x = 0; $x < count($items); $x++)
    {
        $query = "UPDATE * FROM orderable_things SET order = $x WHERE id = ".$items[$x];
        mysql_query($query);
    }
 }
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But you update ALL the items when only one changes, not optimal IMO –  Eduardo Molteni May 7 '09 at 20:42
    
Yes, but in most cases this is not a problem. Obviously if you are dealing with a HA application you will need to employ another approach but I imagine my solution would suffice in an overwhelming number of scenarios. –  pifantastic May 7 '09 at 20:58
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I suppose adding an order field to the table, so you update the information with an AJAX call each time you make a drag and drop. With jQuery it is very easy :-)

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yes but then i would have to recalculate the order for all the items every time, I'm not sure i want to do that –  DFectuoso May 7 '09 at 1:43
    
you will have to update the order each time you make a drag and drop change. Whenever you load the webpage again (on every computer) you will order it by the new order field. The thing is that you can't store it in a cookie, because it's something permanent –  fesja May 7 '09 at 1:55
    
I know i have to store something in the db, but i could store the order of all the list(comma separed) in another table and whenever php loads those values just sort them with the order of the list, but i want to know if someone have another idea –  DFectuoso May 7 '09 at 2:09
    
You don't have to store the updated order every time the user sorts the list. You could have a 'Save' button that makes the ajax call only when the user is ready to save their updated list. –  pifantastic May 7 '09 at 21:17
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I'm thinking about this problem, and the solution I came up is having a decimal number as order and change the number of the item change for a number between the next and the previous item

Order    Item
-----    ----
1        Original Item 1
2        Original Item 2
3        Original Item 3
4        Original Item 4
5        Original Item 5

If you change the item 4 to the 2nd position, you get:

Order    Item
-----    ----
1        Original Item 1
1.5      Original Item 4
2        Original Item 2
3        Original Item 3
5        Original Item 5

If you change the item 3 to the 3rd position, you get:

Order    Item
-----    ----
1        Original Item 1
1.5      Original Item 4
1.75     Original Item 3
2        Original Item 2
5        Original Item 5

Theoretically there is always a decimal between two decimals, but you could face some storage limits.

What do you (stackers) think of this solution?

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DFectuoso, if you have proper db indexes, you should go with the database sort and just store the order in a separate table, file on disk, memcached - take your best pick.

The reason I would go with this solution is that, if you data set gets larger, your reordering/reinserting algorithm would potentially take a long time and you'd have to reorder all of your items.

If you let the db handle the ordering, you can request only a small portion of the items and the db will use an index and wouldn't have to reorder everything, which ideally is very fast.

Otherwise, you could opt in for storing this data in any format you want - serialize the PHP object and store it on disk if you fancy that.

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I would do something similar to Zendesk.

You click a button saying "Edit Order", and when you're done say "Save Order" or something to that effect. These can be Ajax calls to make it more usable, but can also be page refreshes, allowing for degrading gracefully.

So it would be some thing like:

<ul>
<li><input type="hidden" name="item1" value="1" />Item 1</li>
<li><input type="hidden" name="item2" value="2" />Item 2</li>
<li><input type="hidden" name="item3" value="3" />Item 3</li>
<li><input type="hidden" name="item4" value="4" />Item 4</li>
</ul>

When you move the items around, this would change the value of the hidden field. When you post this for you could use those values in an update statement, making one call only. Something like:

UPDATE `things` SET `order` = $value WHERE `name` = $name;

It might not be efficient in this case as there would be 4 SQL statements, although there might be another way to solve this.

I think the main advantage is that you would always have a logical order of 1,2,3,4 instead of anything else if your JavaScript is well written.

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