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What are the reasons behind that we can not declare and define a variable(property) inside a class with the same name of the class itself? For example this code is not right(at least in MS VC++):

class test{

public:
int test;

};
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thanks for the note. –  Aan Nov 30 '11 at 11:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your code is legal, if MS VC++ says otherwise then it is wrong.

In C++11, 9.2/16:

In addition, if class T has a user-declared constructor (12.1), every non-static data member of class T shall have a name different from T.

Your class does not have a user-declared constructor, and the data member you define is non-static, so it can be named test. If it were static, then 9.2/15 says it can't be named test, but 9.2/15 says nothing about non-static data members.

In C++03, it's 9.2/13 and /13a, the rules are the same.

If MS VC++ issues a warning, then that's probably justified. The effect of your data member makes more sense to C programmers than to C++ programmers:

struct test{
    void foo(test &a) {   // "test" is a type here
        struct test t;    // "test is not a type here, "struct test" is
        a = t;
    }
    int test;
};

struct test{
    int test;
    void foo(struct test &a) {   // now "test" is not a type here either
        struct test t;
        a = t;
    }
};
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Thanks, I was trying to find that :) –  Styne666 Nov 30 '11 at 11:56

The constructor takes the name of the class.

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the constructor is a method, I am talking about a property. –  Aan Nov 30 '11 at 11:49
    
Strangely, constructors don't have names (12.1), but they can still affect what names are reserved for what purposes in the class namespace. I don't know what the motivation is. –  Steve Jessop Nov 30 '11 at 11:58
    
It's speculation but perhaps for this scenario? Not that it's a sensible thing to do. –  Styne666 Nov 30 '11 at 12:01

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