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Why doesn't this work ?

class spin(threading.Thread):  
        def __init__(self):
                super(spin,self).__init__()
                self._stop = False
        def run (self,var):
                self.var=var
                print self.var
        def echo (self,var):
                self.var=var
                print self.var

if __name__ == '__main__':

        s = spin()
        s.start('hello')

but this does?

    s = spin()
    s.echo('hello')

Im guessing its because the start sequence needs to be defined in the init ? but not sure how. someone asked for error codes from this:

    s.start('hello')
TypeError: start() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)
share|improve this question
    
I know you deliberately want to skip the basics of python, yet... your code is poorly indented. It should be 4 spaces, not 8 (see PEP8) – mac Nov 30 '11 at 11:54
    
Some traceback would be a nice gift to us... What's the error? What do you mean by "doesn't work"? – Gandi Nov 30 '11 at 11:55
    
i use tabs instead of 4 spaces, ill update the question now. – user1064306 Nov 30 '11 at 11:59
    
btw - im not deliberately skipping anything, Im trying to make sense of a huge subject whilst writing a massive program. its the way i learn. each part of the program has its own problems to work out, and now ive pretty much written it, i decided to try using classes for it and thats opened up a nice can of worms :) – user1064306 Nov 30 '11 at 12:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason s.start('hello') does not work is that the inherited Threadin.start() method takes no arguments other than self.

Calling s.echo('hello') does appear to work, but it calls the function in the context of the main thread instead of spawning a new thread.

One way to fix your code is by supplying var to the constructor:

import threading

class Spin(threading.Thread):  
    def __init__(self,var):
        super(Spin,self).__init__()
        self.var = var
    def run(self):
        print self.var

if __name__ == '__main__':
    s = Spin('hello')
    s.start()
    s.join()
share|improve this answer
    
ah i see, thanks that was all i needed. – user1064306 Nov 30 '11 at 12:03

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