Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to point out right away that I have already searched the site and haven't found a similar problem. There have been questions about someone not being able to put an object in a node but my problem is this:

I cannot put an object inside a Node AND I am not allowed to create a default constructor for the object (at least not inside its class definition)

More specifically:

I have been given following class Employer:

class Employer
{    
public:

    Employer(string x, int a, int b, int c);

    string getname() const { return name; }

private:
    string name;
    int age, sal, hire;
};

Employer::Employer(string x, int a, int b, int c) : name(x), age(a), sal(b), hire(c) { }

As you can see there is no default constructor for this class and I am not allowed to create one (these are the rules..!)

And I have created the following class Node:

class Node
{
public:
    Employer emp;
    Node* link;
    Node(Employer);
};

Node::Node(Employer x)
{
    emp= x;
    link=NULL;
}

as you can see I want to create a Node class that holds a node pointer and an object Employer inside it.

Unfortunately this isn't working. I keep getting the following error message:

E2279: Cannot find default constructor to initialize member.....

Basically what happens is because class Employer has no default constructor, "Employer emp;" in the Node class is not "recognised" by the compiler as it would have been if it was a "int n" instead of a "Employer emp".

So my question is this:

How can I put the object Employer in the Node without changing/adding anything to the class Employer (ie I cannot add a default constructor to the class Employer nor can I add a "friend class Node" kind of thing, the rules are I should leave the class Employer as it is)

Since I am new to programming I'd like to add that I haven't been taught templates yet, so I am not allowed to use any of that, just the tools I've already given you (classes,functions,pointers..etc)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Provide an explicit constructor call for the Employer member in the initializer list:

class Node
{
public:
    Employer emp;
    Node* link;
    Node(Employer e) : emp(e) { }
};

In this example, I chose to use the copy constructor, which you didn't explicitly define for Employer, but which is there anyway. Typically, you would prefer to take the argument by const-reference:

Node::Node(Employer const & e) : emp(e), link(NULL) { }

You can also provide additional constructors, for example:

Node::Node(std::string const & s, int d) : emp(s, 12, d, 24), link(NULL) { }

(The less you put in your constructor body the better.)

share|improve this answer
    
Great! It works! Thank you to everyone who replied! You've been really helpful and..ridiculously fast! (by the way I'm not sure yet why I should be passing Employer by reference and not just by value, I'm passing it by value and it works but I'm getting that Warning about passing by value and not by reference obviously.. but it still works so I'm confused..) –  user1073400 Nov 30 '11 at 17:39
Node::Node(Employer x) : emp(x) {
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Since the poster said they are new to programming, an explanation of what is happening would have been useful - see Kerrek SB's answer.. –  Doug Moscrop Nov 30 '11 at 13:39
1  
Yes, giving an explanation is a valid approach, but I also think that giving a hint and having the OP do the research is another valid approach. Especially if the poster is new to programming. What would be really useful if I names the thing I employed, but I don't remember how these initializers are officially called ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 30 '11 at 13:44
    
@MichaelKrelin-hacker: that said, it might be a bit of a stretch to expect the OP to see a colon and know that she needs to research "constructor initializer lists"... –  Kerrek SB Nov 30 '11 at 14:33
    
Well, if I named the concept, I think there'd be nothing wrong with the expectation. And yes, I admit, it would be great if I did and I'm sorry for not doing so. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 30 '11 at 14:42

Currently you're default-constructing the emp member (or trying to), and then assigning Employer x to it afterwards. Even if you could default-construct it, it would be wasteful to do that and then overwrite it, when you could just set it up correctly in the first place.

Use

Node::Node(Employer x) : emp(x), link(NULL)
{
}

instead. This gives emp and link the correct values immediately.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.