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Can you overload + in haskell?

Can you implement a Matrix class and an * operator that will work on two matrices?:

scala> val x = Matrix(3, 1,2,3,4,5,6)  
x: Matrix =   
[1.0, 2.0, 3.0]  
[4.0, 5.0, 6.0]  

scala> x*x.transpose  
res0: Matrix =   
[14.0, 32.0]  
[32.0, 77.0]  

and just so people don't say that it's hard, here is the Scala implementation (courtesy of Jonathan Merritt):

class Matrix(els: List[List[Double]]) {  

    /** elements of the matrix, stored as a list of  
      its rows */  
    val elements: List[List[Double]] = els  
    def nRows: Int = elements.length  
    def nCols: Int = if (elements.isEmpty) 0   
                     else elements.head.length  

    /** all rows of the matrix must have the same  
        number of columns */  
    require(elements.forall(_.length == nCols))  

    /* Add to each elem of matrix */
    private def addRows(a: List[Double],   
                        b: List[Double]):   
      List[Double] =   
        List.map2(a,b)(_+_)  

    private def subRows(a: List[Double],   
                        b: List[Double]):List[Double] =  
        List.map2(a,b)(_-_)  

    def +(other: Matrix): Matrix = {  
      require((other.nRows == nRows) &&   
              (other.nCols == nCols))  
      new Matrix(  
        List.map2(elements, other.elements)  
          (addRows(_,_))
      )  
    }  

    def -(other: Matrix): Matrix = {  
      require((other.nRows == nRows) &&   
              (other.nCols == nCols))  
      new Matrix(  
        List.map2(elements, other.elements)  
          (subRows(_,_))  
      )  
    }  

    def transpose(): Matrix = new Matrix(List.transpose(elements))    

    private def dotVectors(a: List[Double],   
                       b: List[Double]): Double = {  
      val multipliedElements =   
        List.map2(a,b)(_*_)  
      (0.0 /: multipliedElements)(_+_)  
    }  

    def *(other: Matrix): Matrix = {  
      require(nCols == other.nRows)  
      val t = other.transpose()  
      new Matrix(  
        for (row <- elements) yield {  
          for (otherCol <- t.elements)  
            yield dotVectors(row, otherCol)  
        }  
      )  

    override def toString(): String = {  
        val rowStrings =   
        for (row <- elements)   
          yield row.mkString("[", ", ", "]")  
        rowStrings.mkString("", "\n", "\n")  
    }  
}  

/* Matrix constructor from a bunch of numbers */
object Matrix {  
  def apply(nCols: Int, els: Double*):Matrix = {  
    def splitRowsWorker(  
      inList: List[Double],   
      working: List[List[Double]]):  
    List[List[Double]] =  
      if (inList.isEmpty)  
        working  
      else {  
        val (a, b) = inList.splitAt(nCols)  
        splitRowsWorker(b, working + a)  
      }  
    def splitRows(inList: List[Double]) =  
      splitRowsWorker(inList, List[List[Double]]())  
    val rows: List[List[Double]] =   
      splitRows(els.toList)  
    new Matrix(rows)  
  }  
}  

EDIT I understood that strictly speaking the answer is No: overloading * is not possible without side-effects of defining also a + and others or special tricks. The numeric-prelude package describes it best:

In some cases, the hierarchy is not finely-grained enough: Operations that are often defined independently are lumped together. For instance, in a financial application one might want a type "Dollar", or in a graphics application one might want a type "Vector". It is reasonable to add two Vectors or Dollars, but not, in general, reasonable to multiply them. But the programmer is currently forced to define a method for '(*)' when she defines a method for '(+)'.

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marked as duplicate by Paul Johnson, Matt Fenwick, interjay, C. A. McCann, ChrisF Dec 1 '11 at 22:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
The answers to your previous question showed it exactly. I don't see how they are wishy-washy. –  Mike Hartl Nov 30 '11 at 14:12
5  
There are 7 Num operations: (+), (*), (-), negate, signum, abs, fromInteger. The first four, no problem; signum I suppose should return a unit matrix that is a scalar multiple of the input, abs should return a scalar (and it can't, because the typeclass insists it must return another matrix), and fromInteger doesn't make sense. OK, fine, make abs and fromInteger return errors. That's not perfect but it'll do --- you're already resigned to getting runtime errors when you add two matrices of different sizes. Could someone else expand on the Numeric Prelude, please? –  dave4420 Nov 30 '11 at 14:48
3  
No, the + and * are not "reserved". They are just functions that happen to be part of the same type class (which is very much like an interface in Java). This type class is in the prelude which means it is imported by default. To implement this "interface", you should implement all of its functions, which are the ones mentioned by @dave4420. –  Tikhon Jelvis Nov 30 '11 at 16:47
3  
For square matrices it's natural for fromInteger to return a diagonal matrix. And you can use the determinant as the absolute value. –  augustss Nov 30 '11 at 17:45
3  
Voted to close. Drozzy does not appear to be interested in useful answers or solving a real problem, only in arguing that Haskell is worse than Python because it is not the same as Python. –  Paul Johnson Nov 30 '11 at 18:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It'll be perfectly safe with a smart constructor and stored dimensions. Of course there are no natural implementations for the operations signum and fromIntegral (or maybe a diagonal matrix would be fine for the latter).

module Matrix (Matrix(),matrix,matrixTranspose) where

import Data.List (transpose)

data Matrix a = Matrix {matrixN :: Int, 
                        matrixM :: Int,
                        matrixElems :: [[a]]}
                deriving (Show, Eq)

matrix :: Int -> Int -> [[a]] -> Matrix a
matrix n m vals
  | length vals /= m            = error "Wrong number of rows"
  | any (/=n) $ map length vals = error "Column length mismatch"
  | otherwise = Matrix n m vals

matrixTranspose (Matrix m n vals) = matrix n m (transpose vals)

instance Num a => Num (Matrix a) where

  (+) (Matrix m n vals) (Matrix m' n' vals')
    | m/=m' = error "Row number mismatch"
    | n/=n' = error "Column number mismatch"
    | otherwise = Matrix m n (zipWith (zipWith (+)) vals vals')

  abs (Matrix m n vals) = Matrix m n (map (map abs) vals)

  negate (Matrix m n vals) = Matrix m n (map (map negate) vals)

  (*) (Matrix m n vals) (Matrix n' p vals')
    | n/=n' = error "Matrix dimension mismatch in multiplication"
    | otherwise = let tvals' = transpose vals'
                      dot x y = sum $ zipWith (*) x y
                      result = map (\col -> map (dot col) tvals') vals
                  in Matrix m p result

Test it in ghci:

*Matrix> let a = matrix 3 2 [[1,0,2],[-1,3,1]]
*Matrix> let b = matrix 2 3 [[3,1],[2,1],[1,0]]
*Matrix> a*b
Matrix {matrixN = 3, matrixM = 3, matrixElems = [[5,1],[4,2]]}

Since my Num instance is generic, it even works for complex matrices out of the box:

Prelude Data.Complex Matrix> let c = matrix 2 2 [[0:+1,1:+0],[5:+2,4:+3]]
Prelude Data.Complex Matrix> let a = matrix 2 2 [[0:+1,1:+0],[5:+2,4:+3]]
Prelude Data.Complex Matrix> let b = matrix 2 3 [[3:+0,1],[2,1],[1,0]]
Prelude Data.Complex Matrix> a
Matrix {matrixN = 2, matrixM = 2, matrixElems = [[0.0 :+ 1.0,1.0 :+ 0.0],[5.0 :+ 2.0,4.0 :+ 3.0]]}
Prelude Data.Complex Matrix> b
Matrix {matrixN = 2, matrixM = 3, matrixElems = [[3.0 :+ 0.0,1.0 :+ 0.0],[2.0 :+ 0.0,1.0 :+ 0.0],[1.0 :+ 0.0,0.0 :+ 0.0]]}
Prelude Data.Complex Matrix> a*b
Matrix {matrixN = 2, matrixM = 3, matrixElems = [[2.0 :+ 3.0,1.0 :+ 1.0],[23.0 :+ 12.0,9.0 :+ 5.0]]}

EDIT: new material

Oh, you want to just override the (*) function without any Num stuff. That's possible to o but you'll have to remember that the Haskell standard library has reserved (*) for use in the Num class.

module Matrix where

import qualified Prelude as P
import Prelude hiding ((*))
import Data.List (transpose)

class Multiply a where
  (*) :: a -> a -> a

data Matrix a = Matrix {matrixN :: Int, 
                        matrixM :: Int,
                        matrixElems :: [[a]]}
                deriving (Show, Eq)

matrix :: Int -> Int -> [[a]] -> Matrix a
matrix n m vals
  | length vals /= m            = error "Wrong number of rows"
  | any (/=n) $ map length vals = error "Column length mismatch"
  | otherwise = Matrix n m vals

matrixTranspose (Matrix m n vals) = matrix n m (transpose vals)

instance P.Num a => Multiply (Matrix a) where
  (*) (Matrix m n vals) (Matrix n' p vals')
    | n/=n' = error "Matrix dimension mismatch in multiplication"
    | otherwise = let tvals' = transpose vals'
                      dot x y = sum $ zipWith (P.*) x y
                      result = map (\col -> map (dot col) tvals') vals
                  in Matrix m p result


a = matrix 3 2 [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]]
b = a * matrixTranspose

Testing in ghci:

*Matrix> b
Matrix {matrixN = 3, matrixM = 3, matrixElems = [[14,32],[32,77]]}

There. Now if a third module wants to use both the Matrix version of (*) and the Prelude version of (*) it'll have to of course import one or the other qualified. But that's just business as usual.

I could've done all of this without the Multiply type class but this implementation leaves our new shiny (*) open for extension in other modules.

share|improve this answer
5  
@drozzy: also, I'll add that Haskellers tend to use new operators (like the |+| from your previous question) instead of overloading when overloading isn't exactly the right thing. This is a big contrast to languages like C++ or Python where the set of operators is limited so people have to keep reusing (or actually misusing) them. –  opqdonut Nov 30 '11 at 15:51
5  
As has already been shown, you can override + and * just fine. You just have to make explicit that you do so. –  augustss Nov 30 '11 at 17:32
3  
"That is EXACTLY what I wanted to know. I wanted to know how "flexible" Haskell was before I started learning it." - then you should have said EXACTLY that in your question. I'm sorry that it took too long to figure out. –  nponeccop Nov 30 '11 at 19:30
1  
Well, I wanted to know that haskell library has * reserved for Num class. I mean I couldn't have asked that if I didn't know about it - could I? –  drozzy Nov 30 '11 at 19:37
6  
Just to make this explicit: the "reserved" here is not at all the same as the "reserved" in "case, let, and where are reserved words". You can happily define a (*) function in your new Haskell module, but it's like defining a new type in Scala called Seq. You can, but there's already a default. The difference is that in Haskell, functions live in global scope, whereas in Scala, they live in types/classes/modules do. –  Antal S-Z Nov 30 '11 at 22:33

Alright, there's a lot of confusion about what's happening here floating around, and it's not being helped by the fact that the Haskell term "class" does not line up with the OO term "class" in any meaningful way. So let's try to make a careful answer. This answer starts with Haskell's module system.

In Haskell, when you import a module Foo.Bar, it creates a new set of bindings. For each variable x exported by the module Foo.Bar, you get a new name Foo.Bar.x. In addition, you may:

  • import qualified or not. If you import qualified, nothing more happens. If you do not, an additional name without the module prefix is defined; in this case, just plain old x is defined.
  • change the qualification prefix or not. If you import as Alias, then the name Foo.Bar.x is not defined, but the name Alias.x is.
  • hide certain names. If you hide name foo, then neither the plain name foo nor any qualified name (like Foo.Bar.foo or Alias.foo) is defined.

Furthermore, names may be multiply defined. For example, if Foo.Bar and Baz.Quux both export the variable x, and I import both modules without qualification, then the name x refers to both Foo.Bar.x and Baz.Quux.x. If the name x is never used in the resulting module, this clash is ignored; otherwise, a compiler error asks you to provide more qualification.

Finally, if none of your imports mention the module Prelude, the following implicit import is added:

import Prelude

This imports the Prelude without qualification, with no additional prefix, and without hiding any names. So it defines "bare" names and names prefixed by Prelude., and nothing more.

Here ends the bare basics you need to understand about the module system. Now let's discuss the bare basics you need to understand about typeclasses.

A typeclass includes a class name, a list of type variables bound by that class, and a collection of variables with type signatures that refer to the bound variables. Here's an example:

class Foo a where
    foo :: a -> a -> Int

The class name is Foo, the bound type variable is a, and there is only one variable in the collection, namely foo, with type signature a -> a -> Int. This class declares that some types have a binary operation, named foo, which computes an Int. Any type may later (even in another module) be declared to be an instance of this class: this involves defining the binary operation above, where the bound type variable a is substituted with the type you are creating an instance for. As an example, we might implement this for integers by the instance:

instance Foo Int where
    foo a b = (a `mod` 76) * (b + 7)

Here ends the bare basics you need to understand about typeclasses. We may now answer your question. The only reason the question is tricky is because it falls smack dab on the intersection between two name management techniques: modules and typeclasses. Below I discuss what this means for your specific question.

The module Prelude defines a typeclass named Num, which includes in its collection of variables a variable named *. Therefore, we have several options for the name *:

  • If the type signature we desire happens to follow the pattern a -> a -> a, for some type a, then we may implement the Num typeclass. We therefore extend the Num class with a new instance; the name Prelude.* and any aliases for this name are extended to work for the new type. For matrices, this would look like, for example,

    instance Num Matrix where
        m * n = {- implementation goes here -}
    
  • We may define a different name than *.

    m |*| n = {- implementation goes here -}
    
  • We may define the name *. Whether this name is defined as part of a new type class or not is immaterial. If we do nothing else, there will then be at least two definitions of *, namely, the one in the current module and the one implicitly imported from the Prelude. We have a variety of ways of dealing with this. The simplest is to explicitly import the Prelude, and ask for the name * not to be defined:

    import Prelude hiding ((*))
    

You might alternately choose to leave the implicit import of Prelude, and use a qualified * everywhere you use it. Other solutions are also possible.

The main point I want you to take away from this is: the name * is in no way special. It is just a name defined by the Prelude, and all of the tools we have available for namespace control are available.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! And I assume you want your Prelude stuff to always be available, so that is why you don't want to hide the default (+)? –  drozzy Nov 30 '11 at 19:53
    
Does anybody know how to include preformatted text (code) in a bullet list? –  Daniel Wagner Nov 30 '11 at 19:55
2  
@drozzy I didn't make any claims about what I want or about what you want. When it's appropriate to hide the Prelude's +, then you should hide the Prelude's +. –  Daniel Wagner Nov 30 '11 at 19:56
2  
@Daniel: You just indent the code an extra four spaces (so a total of eight). I took the liberty of doing that for you (I needed to make sure it worked somehow :-) ) –  Antal S-Z Nov 30 '11 at 22:36

You can implement * as matrix multiplication by defining an instance of Num class for Matrix. But the code won't be type-safe: * (and other arithmetic operations) on matrices as you define them is not total, because of size mismatch or in case of '/' non-existence of inverse matrices.

As for 'the hierarchy is not defined precisely' - there is also Monoid type class, exactly for the cases when only one operation is defined.

There are too many things to be 'added', sometimes in rather exotic ways (think of permutation groups). Haskell designers designed to reserve arithmetical operations for different representations of numbers, and use other names for more exotic cases.

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Sorry I asked for the actual implementation, not the fact that I can do it. –  drozzy Nov 30 '11 at 15:46
2  
@drozzy -- no, you said Can you implement a Matrix class and an * operator that will work on two matrices?, which nponeccop answered. +1 –  Matt Fenwick Nov 30 '11 at 17:53
    
No I meant: Can YOU implement it. –  drozzy Nov 30 '11 at 18:18
4  
And the answer is "yes I can". –  Paul Johnson Nov 30 '11 at 19:23
1  
When somebody says "can I get a witness?" many just respond "amen". A computer scientist, on the other hand, might ask if you're in working in a constructivist logic... –  sclv Nov 30 '11 at 19:54

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