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Can someone explain me in simple terms, why does this code throw an exception, "Comparison method violates its general contract!", and how do I fix it?

private int compareParents(Foo s1, Foo s2) {
    if (s1.getParent() == s2) return -1;
    if (s2.getParent() == s1) return 1;
    return 0;
}
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4  
This code does not throw an exception. Please show us the code that does (probably some code that uses this method, or the class it is in). –  ibid Nov 30 '11 at 14:35
    
What is the name and class of the Exception? Is it an IllegalArgumentException? If I had to guess I would think that you should be doing s1.getParent().equals(s2) instead of s1.getParent() == s2. –  Freiheit Nov 30 '11 at 14:35
    
And the exception that is thrown as well. –  Matthew Farwell Nov 30 '11 at 14:36
2  
I don't know much about Java or about Java comparison APIs, but this comparison method seems dead wrong. Suppose s1 is the parent of s2, and s2 is not the parent of s1. Then compareParents(s1, s2) is 0, but compareParents(s2, s1) is 1. That doesn't make sense. (In addition, it's not transitive, like aix mentioned below.) –  mquander Nov 30 '11 at 14:38
3  
This error appears to only be produced by a specific library cr.openjdk.java.net/~martin/webrevs/openjdk7/timsort/src/share/… –  Peter Lawrey Nov 30 '11 at 14:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Your comparator is not transitive.

Let A be the parent of B, and B be the parent of C. Since A > B and B > C, then it must be the case that A > C. However, if your comparator is invoked on A and C, it would return zero, meaning A == C. This violates the contract and hence throws the exception.

It's rather nice of the library to detect this and let you know, rather than behave erratically.

One way to satisfy the transitivity requirement in compareParents() is to traverse the getParent() chain instead of only looking at the immediate ancestor.

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You can't compare object data like this:s1.getParent() == s2 - this will compare the object references. You should override equals function for Foo class and then compare them like this s1.getParent().equals(s2)

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No, actually I think OP is trying to sort a list of some sort, and wants to actually compare references. –  Edward Falk May 15 '13 at 22:01

Just because this is what I got when I Googled this error, my problem was that I had

if (value < other.value)
  return -1;
else if (value >= other.value)
  return 1;
else
  return 0;

the value >= other.value should (obviously) actually be value > other.value so that you can actually return 0 with equal objects.

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I have to add that if any of your value is a NaN (if value is a double or float), it would fail as well. –  Matthieu Apr 11 at 18:44

I've seen this happen in a piece of code where the often recurring check for null values was performed:

if(( A==null ) && ( B==null ) return +1;//WRONG: two null values should return 0!!!

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The violation of the contract often means that the comparator is not providing the correct or consistent value when comparing objects. For example, you might want to perform a string compare and force empty strings to sort to the end with:

if ( one.length() == 0 ) {
    return 1;                   // empty string sorts last
}
if ( two.length() == 0 ) {
    return -1;                  // empty string sorts last                  
}
return one.compareToIgnoreCase( two );

But this overlooks the case where BOTH one and two are empty - and in that case, the wrong value is returned (1 instead of 0 to show a match), and the comparator reports that as a violation. It should have been written as:

if ( one.length() == 0 ) {
    if ( two.length() == 0 ) {
        return 0;               // BOth empty - so indicate
    }
    return 1;                   // empty string sorts last
}
if ( two.length() == 0 ) {
    return -1;                  // empty string sorts last                  
}
return one.compareToIgnoreCase( two );
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Java does not check consistency in a strict sense, only notifies you if it runs into serious trouble. Also it does not give you much information from the error.

I was puzzled with what's happening in my sorter and made a strict consistencyChecker, maybe this will help you:

/**
 * @param dailyReports
 * @param comparator
 */
public static <T> void checkConsitency(final List<T> dailyReports, final Comparator<T> comparator) {
  final Map<T, List<T>> objectMapSmallerOnes = new HashMap<T, List<T>>();

  iterateDistinctPairs(dailyReports.iterator(), new IPairIteratorCallback<T>() {
    /**
     * @param o1
     * @param o2
     */
    @Override
    public void pair(T o1, T o2) {
      final int diff = comparator.compare(o1, o2);
      if (diff < Compare.EQUAL) {
        checkConsistency(objectMapSmallerOnes, o1, o2);
        getListSafely(objectMapSmallerOnes, o2).add(o1);
      } else if (Compare.EQUAL < diff) {
        checkConsistency(objectMapSmallerOnes, o2, o1);
        getListSafely(objectMapSmallerOnes, o1).add(o2);
      } else {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Equals not expected?");
      }
    }
  });
}

/**
 * @param objectMapSmallerOnes
 * @param o1
 * @param o2
 */
static <T> void checkConsistency(final Map<T, List<T>> objectMapSmallerOnes, T o1, T o2) {
  final List<T> smallerThan = objectMapSmallerOnes.get(o1);

  if (smallerThan != null) {
    for (final T o : smallerThan) {
      if (o == o2) {
        throw new IllegalStateException(o2 + "  cannot be smaller than " + o1 + " if it's supposed to be vice versa.");
      }
      checkConsistency(objectMapSmallerOnes, o, o2);
    }
  }
}

/**
 * @param keyMapValues 
 * @param key 
 * @param <Key> 
 * @param <Value> 
 * @return List<Value>
 */ 
public static <Key, Value> List<Value> getListSafely(Map<Key, List<Value>> keyMapValues, Key key) {
  List<Value> values = keyMapValues.get(key);

  if (values == null) {
    keyMapValues.put(key, values = new LinkedList<Value>());
  }

  return values;
}

/**
 * @author Oku
 *
 * @param <T>
 */
public interface IPairIteratorCallback<T> {
  /**
   * @param o1
   * @param o2
   */
  void pair(T o1, T o2);
}

/**
 * 
 * Iterates through each distinct unordered pair formed by the elements of a given iterator
 *
 * @param it
 * @param callback
 */
public static <T> void iterateDistinctPairs(final Iterator<T> it, IPairIteratorCallback<T> callback) {
  List<T> list = Convert.toMinimumArrayList(new Iterable<T>() {

    @Override
    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
      return it;
    }

  });

  for (int outerIndex = 0; outerIndex < list.size() - 1; outerIndex++) {
    for (int innerIndex = outerIndex + 1; innerIndex < list.size(); innerIndex++) {
      callback.pair(list.get(outerIndex), list.get(innerIndex));
    }
  }
}
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