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in my Silverlight 4 application I started creating and using some generics and now I stumbled upon the following problem:

In a non-generic class, I have a abstract method, that returns a generic class:

public abstract class DTO_Base()
{
  public abstract ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> CreateBusinessObject();
}

The generic class is defined in the following way:

public abstract class ServiceModelBase<RootNodeType> where RootNodeType : ServiceNodeBase

Naturally, from DTO_Base derived classes will have to override the CreateBusinessObject method:

public class DTO_Editor : DTO_Base
{
  public override ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> CreateBusinessObject()
  {
    // the object to return have to be of type ServiceModelEditor
    // which is derived from ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor>
    // public class ServiceModelEditor : ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor>

    // ServiceNodeEditor is derived from ServiceNodeBase
    // public class ServiceNodeEditor : ServiceNodeBase
    ServiceModelEditor target = new ServiceModelEditor()

    ...
    Functions to populate the 'target'
    ...

    return target;
  }
}

The line return target; causes an error, stating that it isn't possible to implicitly convert the type ServiceModelEditor in ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase>. Also, an explicit conversion via target as ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> doesn't work.

How would I have to implement this method to work?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

public interface IDTO<Node> where Node : ServiceNodeBase
{
    ServiceModelBase<Node> CreateBusinessObject();
}
public abstract class DTO_Base<Model,Node> : IDTO<Node>
    where Model : ServiceModelBase<Node>
    where Node : ServiceNodeBase
{
    public abstract Model CreateBusinessObject();


    #region IDTO<Node> Members

    ServiceModelBase<Node> IDTO<Node>.CreateBusinessObject()
    {
        return CreateBusinessObject();
    }

    #endregion
}

public class DTO_Editor : DTO_Base<ServiceModelEditor, ServiceNodeEditor>
{

    public override ServiceModelEditor CreateBusinessObject()
    {
        // the object to return have to be of type ServiceModelEditor
        // which is derived from ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor>
        // public class ServiceModelEditor : ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor>

        // ServiceNodeEditor is derived from ServiceNodeBase
        // public class ServiceNodeEditor : ServiceNodeBase
        ServiceModelEditor target = new ServiceModelEditor();


        return target;

    }
}

I have faced a similar problem before and the only thing reasonable to do is to make the core base class generic also. You can remove the Model generic parameter (and the interface) and it will look a little less scary, but you loose visibility on the functionality of ServiceModelEditor outside of the method.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, this works! Even without the interface, so, is the interface you created necessary to preserve me from later trouble? – Aaginor Dec 1 '11 at 14:50

As it is, you've got to return a ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase>. One option is to make your base class generic:

public abstract class DtoBase<T> where T : RootNodeType
{
    public abstract ServiceModelBase<T> CreateBusinessObject();
}

Then:

public class DtoEditor : DtoBase<ServiceNodeBase>
{
    public override ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> CreateBusinessObject()
    {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
"public class DtoEditor : DtoBase<ServiceNodeEditor>" I think – KooKiz Nov 30 '11 at 15:17
    
@KooKiz: I don't think so - not in terms of the return value from the method. ServiceModelEditor would have to derive from ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> though. – Jon Skeet Nov 30 '11 at 15:22
    
Yeah but it's already mentionned in the code comments that ServiceModelEditor derives from ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor> – KooKiz Nov 30 '11 at 15:29
    
@KooKiz: Then the question is internally inconsistent, basically :) – Jon Skeet Nov 30 '11 at 15:33
    
Then how to construct this consistently? The whole point in deriving ServiceModelEditor from ServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor> is to have the generic type from the ServiceModelBase class to ServiceNodeEditor. If I would set it to ServiceNodeBase, I would not need this whole generics approach at all. This generic stuff seems to make the whole construction more complicated and more confusing, or I might just use generics in a wrong way. – Aaginor Nov 30 '11 at 15:50

If you are using .Net 4.0 I suggest you use interfaces to define your ServiceModelBase and specify an out variance modifier on that interface generic type:

class ServiceNodeBase { }
class ServiceNodeEditor : ServiceNodeBase {/*implementation*/}
//
interface IServiceModelBase<out RootNodeType>
    where RootNodeType : ServiceNodeBase { 
}
class ServiceModelEditor : IServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeEditor> {
    /*implementation*/
}
//
abstract class DTO_Base {
    public abstract IServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> CreateBusinessObject();
}
class DTO_Editor : DTO_Base {
    public override IServiceModelBase<ServiceNodeBase> CreateBusinessObject() {
        return new ServiceModelEditor();
    }
}
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