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I am creating a game using an array, I have my Hunter class which looks somewhat like this ;

 public static int x= 11;
public static int y =11;
public static String name = "H";`

And a method for its path using x and y.

I have declared hunter as an array in my board (2d array) class this way;

public Hunter hunters[] = new Hunter[5];

and the position of a hunter is declared in the board class as ;

a2[Hunter.x][Hunter.y] = Hunter.name;

Question: I want 5 hunters to appear on the board, how do I use the array to spawn additional 4 hunters? Thanks.

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Your question isn't a matter of multiple-inheritance so the tag isn't right. It is simply a matter of static VS instance state. Simply remove the static modifier to your variables and you can instantiate multiple hunters with different states. –  Kevin Coulombe Nov 30 '11 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

you created your array fine all you need to do is use it:

for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    a2[hunters[i].x][hunters[i].y] = hunters[i].name
}

also, you need to make your Hunter members non-static

class Hunter
{
    private int x, y;

    public void setLocation(int x_, int y_)
    {
        x = x_; y = y_;
    }
}

you get the idea :)

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I have removed static from my code completely, however in my Main method, it still cannot execute non-static methods from a static context(even though my main method is now 'public void main(String[] args)', does the main method is automatically static? –  Chris Arom Nov 30 '11 at 17:01

The static keyword (assuming you are using C++, java, C#) means that the variable is shared among all instances of the Hunter class. To allow each Hunter to have its own position, remove the static keyword and initialize them with a constructor.

I'll assume you're using Java bases on your use of String:

public class Hunter {
    public int x;
    public int y;
    public String name;

    public Hunter(int x, int y, string name) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Then to initialize 5 you would do

int numHunters = 5;
for (int i = 0; i < numHunters; i ++) {
    hunters[i] = new Hunter(/* put x and y and name here */);
}

You can then use them to populate the board:

for (int i = 0; i < numHunters; i ++) {
    Hunter h = hunters[i];
    a2[h.x][h.y] = h.name;
}
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So now that I have done it ( all of them are at 11,11 so i can't tell if there are really 5) I had the code to move them around, now i cant find a way to actually do it. It was placed in my hunter class, x = x+1; for example, how do I replicate it now? –  Chris Arom Nov 30 '11 at 18:02

You didn't specify what language you're using. That would help a bit. At a minimum, try removing the "static" keyword from your property definitions.

In C#, your Hunter class might look like

public class Hunter
{
    public int x;
    public int y;
    public String name;
    public Hunter(int newX, int newY, String newName)
    {
        x = newX;
        y = newY;
        name = newName;
    }
}

You create new Hunters using Hunter h1 = new Hunter(11, 11, "H");. Once created, you can do whatever with it.

You may want to do some reading up on Object Oriented Programming - see Intro to OOP esp sections 4.3 - 4.5 (they're short)

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