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I was reading Steven Sanderson's post where he had mentioned this concept and makes clever use of it. However, the concept remains vague to me. Reminds me of INamingContainer from web forms though. Official documentation doesn't say much about it either (based on what I have been able to trawl). Also, what are the general pitfalls and rules of thumb when it comes to the resulting client-side IDs in MVC?

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1 Answer 1

Let's take an example:

public class A
{
    public B B { get; set; }
}

public class B
{
    public C C { get; set; }
}

public class C
{
    public string SomeProperty { get; set; }    
}

Now let's suppose that we have a view which is strongly typed to A:

@model A
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.B)

Inside this view we are inside the context of A. Then we render the editor template of B:

@model B
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.C)

Now even if we are inside the template for B, it remembered that this template was invoked in the context of A. Finally we go to the C template:

@model C
@Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.SomeProperty)

Inside the C template it remembered that this template was invoked in the context of B which itself was invoked in the context of A so it will generate the following name for the textbox:

<input type="text" name="B.C.SomeProperty" id="B_C_SomeProperty" />

So basically the ASP.NET MVC templates remember the context in which they were called.

This also works with collections. For example:

public class B
{
    public IEnumerable<C> C { get; set; }
}

and then you do:

@model B
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.C)

and inside the template for C:

@model C
@Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.SomeProperty)

since the C editor template will be rendered for each element of the collection it will generate:

<input type="text" name="B.C[0].SomeProperty" id="B_C0_SomeProperty" />
<input type="text" name="B.C[1].SomeProperty" id="B_C1_SomeProperty" />
<input type="text" name="B.C[2].SomeProperty" id="B_C2_SomeProperty" />
...
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Spectacular explanation!! Thanks. Would it be correct to assume that the framework uses ModelMetadata.ContainerType property to get the type name prefixes? –  Abhinav Nov 30 '11 at 18:00
    
Thanks for this answer Darin. Peraps @Abhinav will mark this answer as "Acceped" soon! –  Jamie Dixon Oct 15 '12 at 10:02

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