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I'm having trouble setting up and placing values into an array using a text file containing the floating point numbers 2.1 and 4.3 each number is separated by a space - below is the error I'm getting:

Exception in thread "main" java.util.NoSuchElementException

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class DoubleArray {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException {   

        Scanner in = new Scanner(new FileReader("mytestnumbers.txt"));

        double [] nums = new double[2];

        for (int counter=0; counter < 2; counter++) {
            int index = 0;
            index++;
            nums[index] = in.nextDouble();
        }
    }
}

Thanks, I'm sure this isn't a hard question to answer... I appreciate your time.

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1  
can you include the file? –  Nathan Feger Nov 30 '11 at 17:49
1  
can you please provide content of you mytestnumbers.txt? –  Ján Vorčák Nov 30 '11 at 17:49
1  
Can you add the stack trace from the exception - at least the top few lines –  gkamal Nov 30 '11 at 17:52
    
at java.util.Scanner.throwFor(Scanner.java:855) at java.util.Scanner.next(Scanner.java:1478) at java.util.Scanner.nextDouble(Scanner.java:2404) –  user1062058 Nov 30 '11 at 17:54
    
Double Array? What does it mean? –  Doug Nov 30 '11 at 18:15
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should always use hasNext*() method before calling next*() method

    for (int counter=0; counter < 2; counter++) {
       if(in.hasNextDouble(){ 
           nums[1] = in.nextDouble();
       }
    }

but I think you are not doing the right, I'd rather

    for (int counter=0; counter < 2; counter++) {
       if(in.hasNextDouble(){ 
           nums[counter] = in.nextDouble();
       }
    }

NoSuchElementException is thrown by nextDouble method @see javadoc

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Thanks, this worked fine. I'm confused though, I remember doing it the way I did with ints without error? What makes Doubles different or am I way off track? –  user1062058 Nov 30 '11 at 18:01
    
Nevermind, I just tried it with ints.. they too require the hasNext –  user1062058 Nov 30 '11 at 18:03
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I would suggest printing the value of index out immediately before you use it; you should spot the problem pretty quickly.

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That's what I thought... but then noticed that index is always 1 (I have confused it with counter). –  NPE Nov 30 '11 at 17:49
3  
This is going to be his next problem. Right now, he's getting NoSuchElementException probably from the Scanner not actually having doubles to bring in. –  corsiKa Nov 30 '11 at 17:51
    
hi, I did this and it prints out the values fine... it's showing that exception error at the bottom though? –  user1062058 Nov 30 '11 at 17:52
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It would appear you're not getting good values from your file.

Oli is also correct that you have a problem with your index, but I would try this to verify you're getting doubles from your file:

String s = in.next();
System.out.println("Got token '" + s + "'"); // is this a double??
double d = Double.parseDouble(s);

EDIT: I take this partly back...

You simply don't have tokens to get. Here's what next double would have given you for exceptions:

InputMismatchException - if the next token does not match the Float 
                         regular expression, or is out of range 
NoSuchElementException - if the input is exhausted 
IllegalStateException - if this scanner is closed
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I did not understand what you are trying to do in your loop ?

for (int counter=0; counter < 2; counter++) {
        int index = 0;
        index++;                <--------
        nums[index] = in.nextDouble();
}

You are declaring index = 0 then incrementing it to 1 and then using it.

Why are you not writing int index = 1; directly ?

Because it is getting declared to be zero each time loop is run and then changes value to 1. Either you should declare it out side the loop.

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Every time the cycle does an iteration, it's declaring the variable index and then you increase index with index++. Instead of using index, use counter, like this: num [counter] = in.nextDouble().

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Okay, I did that; that makes sense to me, but still the exception error –  user1062058 Nov 30 '11 at 17:58
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You should initialize index outside of your for loop.

int index = 0;
for (int counter=0; counter < 2; counter++) 
{  
    index++;
    nums[index] = in.nextDouble();
}

Your index was getting set to zero at the beginning of each iteration of your for loop.

EDIT: You also need to check to make sure you still have input.

int index = 0;
for (int counter=0; counter < 2; counter++) 
{
    if(!in.hasNextDouble())
       break;
    index++;
    nums[index] = in.nextDouble();
}
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thanks, I'm still seeing the error though –  user1062058 Nov 30 '11 at 17:57
    
See my edit. You also need to check to see if there is more input left from the file. –  philipvr Nov 30 '11 at 18:02
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Check your mytestnumbers.txt file and ensure that the data that you are trying to scan is in the correct format. The exception that you are getting implies it is not.

Keep in mind that in.nextDouble() will be searching for double numbers separated by white space. In other words, "4.63.7" is not equal to "4.6 3.7" — the space is required. (I do not remember off the top of my head, but I believe that nextDouble() will only search for numbers containing a decimal point, so I do not believe that "4" is equal to "4.0". If you are seeking decimal numbers with this method, then you should have decimal numbers in your file.)

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