Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't know syntax of Go. Can anybody help me to convert following java code in google's go language .

import java.io.*;

class FileWrite 
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    try {
      // Create file 
      FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter("out.txt");
      BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream);
      out.write("Hello Java");
      // Close the output stream
      out.close();
    } catch (Exception e){ //Catch exception if any
      System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
    }
  }
}

This java code creates a file named out.txt and write a string (Hello Java) on the file.

share|improve this question
    
What have you got so far? Is there a particular difficulty with the syntax that you're having? –  Hannele Nov 30 '11 at 18:13
    
I don't understanding, how to create a file in go and how to write on it. Sorry, for my English. –  alessandro Nov 30 '11 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

But, how this problem can solved ? play.golang.org/p/169zmQvK7m – alessandro

For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "strconv"
)

func routine(fd *os.File) {
    abc := 1
    fd.WriteString("Hello Go " + strconv.Itoa(abc) + " ok\n")
    fd.WriteString("\nHello Gopher!\n")
}

func main() {
    fd, err := os.Create("out.txt")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    defer fd.Close()
    abc := 1
    fd.WriteString("Hello Go " + strconv.Itoa(abc) + " ok\n")
    fd.WriteString("\nHello Gopher!\n")
    routine(fd)
}
share|improve this answer
package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    fd, err := os.Create("out.txt")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(os.Stderr, err)
        return
    }
    // defer calls a function at the end of the current function.           
    defer fd.Close()

    fd.WriteString("Hello Gopher!\n")
}

I hope this helps. If this is not clear, please specify which part needs explanation.

share|improve this answer
    
This is nice. I add abc := 1 (integer declaration) and fd.WriteString("Hello Gopher!" , abc " ok\n"). Go can't print int together with string ? How can it possible ? –  alessandro Nov 30 '11 at 19:09
    
Why wtr.WriteString("Hello Gopher!\n") takes it to new line ? –  alessandro Nov 30 '11 at 19:28

For example,

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "strconv"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Create("out.txt")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    defer f.Close()
    wtr := bufio.NewWriter(f)
    abc := 1
    _, err = wtr.WriteString("Hello Go " + strconv.Itoa(abc) + " ok\n")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    err = wtr.Flush()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
}

file out.txt:
Hello Go 1 ok\n

String literals

A string literal represents a string constant obtained from concatenating a sequence of characters. There are two forms: raw string literals and interpreted string literals.

Raw string literals are character sequences between back quotes ``. Within the quotes, any character is legal except back quote. The value of a raw string literal is the string composed of the uninterpreted characters between the quotes; in particular, backslashes have no special meaning and the string may span multiple lines.

Interpreted string literals are character sequences between double quotes "". The text between the quotes, which may not span multiple lines, forms the value of the literal, with backslash escapes interpreted as they are in character literals (except that \' is illegal and \" is legal). The three-digit octal (\nnn) and two-digit hexadecimal (\xnn) escapes represent individual bytes of the resulting string; all other escapes represent the (possibly multi-byte) UTF-8 encoding of individual characters. Thus inside a string literal \377 and \xFF represent a single byte of value 0xFF=255, while ÿ, \u00FF, \U000000FF and \xc3\xbf represent the two bytes 0xc3 0xbf of the UTF-8 encoding of character U+00FF.

share|improve this answer
3  
Your "translation" is more accurate, mine is a free-form one! –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 19:08
    
This is nice. I add abc := 1 (integer declaration) and wtr.WriteString("Hello Go" , abc, " ok\n"). Go can't print int together with string ? How can it possible ? –  alessandro Nov 30 '11 at 19:11
    
See the revised code. –  peterSO Nov 30 '11 at 19:25
    
Why wtr.WriteString("Hello Go\n") takes it to new line ? –  alessandro Nov 30 '11 at 19:26
1  
"Hello Go\n" is an interpreted string literal therefore "\n" is interpreted as a newline character. –  peterSO Nov 30 '11 at 19:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.