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We have one of those weird cryptic data corruption bugs that pops up every few weeks and no one knows why. So far, it appears that the primary key on a table is spontaneously changing, so other rows that point to it are now messed up.

Though I'm still looking for the root cause of this (it's impossible to repro), I would like some sort of temporary hack to prevent a column value from ever changing. Here's the table schema:

CREATE TABLE TPM_INITIATIVES  ( 
    INITIATIVEID    NUMBER NOT NULL,
    NAME            VARCHAR2(100) NOT NULL,
    ACTIVE          CHAR(1) NULL,
    SORTORDER       NUMBER NULL,
    SHORTNAME       VARCHAR2(100) NULL,
    PROJECTTYPEID   NUMBER NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT TPM_INITIATIVES_PK PRIMARY KEY(INITIATIVEID)
    NOT DEFERRABLE
     VALIDATE
)

We of course need to be able to create new rows, but I want to prevent ANYTHING from changing INITIATIVEID ever, no matter what weird queries are being run.

Some ideas I can think of:

  • I'm not really familiar with table permissions on Oracle (I'm more of a Postgres guy), but can't you GRANT or DENY update rights on a certain column to all users? Would this just affect updates, or INSERTS as well? What would be the command the DENY updates to this column?
  • Create some sort of trigger that runs on ROW UPDATE. Can we detect if the INITIATIVEID is being changed, and if so, throw an exception or blow up in some way?

At the very least, can we trap and/or log this event to see when it happens and what the query is that causes INITIATIVEID to change?

Thanks!

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Also watch out for creating duplicate rows and deleting the old row. –  Dour High Arch Nov 30 '11 at 18:28
    
Yea, I actually noticed there was a UNIQUE constraint on INITIATIVEID but someone had disabled it (?!?!) - I've already gone ahead and re-enabled it and verified it works, so hopefully that'll help this bug go away too. I think preventing updates to the key will put a nail in the coffin of this issue though. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 18:31
    
Oh BTW, the code that inserts new rows is pretty abysmal. It basically does a `SELECT MAX(INITIATIVEID) FROM INITIATIVES' and adds 1 to that to get the new ID. It's completely not transaction safe, and it's really slow. This is why I like using UUIDs for my keys, but that would be a pretty massive change now. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 18:34
    
@MikeChristensen you could perhaps query user_source for SELECT MAX(INITIATIVEID) and replace them with a sequence.. –  Sathya Dec 1 '11 at 4:53
    
Yea using a sequence is the way to go - However, Oracle doesn't support automatically using a sequence for a table and I have no idea how to get the .NET Entity Framework to use a sequence for inserts. –  Mike Christensen Dec 1 '11 at 5:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If there are child tables populated with data that references the INITIATIVEID column, Oracle should automatically make it difficult to change the primary key value by preventing you from creating orphan rows by changing the parent's primary key. So, for example, if there is a child table that has a foreign key constraint to TPM_INITIATIVES and there is a row in this child table with an INITIATIVEID of 17, you won't be able to change the INITIATIVEID of the row in the TPM_INITIAITVES table whose current value is 17. If there is no row in any child table that refers to the particular row in the TPM_INITIATIVES table, you could change the value but, presumably, if there are no relationships, changing the primary key value is unimportant since it can't, by definition, cause a data integrity problem. Of course, you could have code that inserts a new row into TPM_INITIATIVES with a new INITIATIVEID, change all the rows in the child table that refer to the old row to refer to the new row, then modify the old row. But this won't be trapped by any of the proposed solutions.

If your application has defined child tables but not declared the appropriate foreign key constraints, that would be the best way to resolve the problem.

That being said, Arnon's solution of creating a view should work. You'd rename the table, create a view with the same name as the existing table, and (potentially) define an INSTEAD OF trigger on the view that would simply never update the INITIATIVEID column. That shouldn't require changes to other bits of the application.

You could also define a trigger on the table

CREATE TRIGGER trigger_name 
  BEFORE UPDATE ON TPM_INITIATIVES  
  FOR EACH ROW
DECLARE
BEGIN
  IF( :new.initiativeID != :old.initiativeID )
  THEN
    RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR( -20001, 'Sorry Charlie.  You can''t update the initiativeID column' );
  END IF;
END;

Someone could, of course, disable the trigger and issue an update. But I'm assuming you're not trying to stop an attacker, just a buggy piece of code.

Based on the description of what symptoms you are seeing, however, it would seem to make more sense to log the history of changes to columns in this table so that you can actually determine what is going on rather than guessing and trying to plug holes one-by-one. So, for example, you could do something like this

CREATE TABLE TPM_INITIATIVES_HIST (
   INITIATIVEID    NUMBER NOT NULL,
   NAME            VARCHAR2(100) NOT NULL,
   ACTIVE          CHAR(1) NULL,
   SORTORDER       NUMBER NULL,
   SHORTNAME       VARCHAR2(100) NULL,
   PROJECTTYPEID   NUMBER NOT NULL,
   OPERATIONTYPE   VARCHAR2(1) NOT NULL,
   CHANGEUSERNAME  VARCHAR2(30),
   CHANGEDATE      DATE,
   COMMENT         VARCHAR2(4000)
);

CREATE TRIGGER trigger_name 
  BEFORE INSERT or UPDATE or DELETE ON TPM_INITIATIVES  
  FOR EACH ROW
DECLARE
  l_comment VARCHAR2(4000);
BEGIN
  IF( inserting )
  THEN
    INSERT INTO tpm_initiatives_hist( INITIATIVEID, NAME, ACTIVE, SORTORDER, SHORTNAME, PROJECTTYPEID, 
                                      OPERATIONTYPE, CHANGEUSERNAME, CHANGEDATE )
      VALUES( :new.initiativeID, :new.name, :new.active, :new.sortOrder, :new.shortName, :new.projectTypeID, 
              'I', USER, SYSDATE );
  ELSIF( inserting )
  THEN
    IF( :new.initiativeID != :old.initiativeID )
    THEN
      l_comment := 'Initiative ID changed from ' || :old.initiativeID || ' to ' || :new.initiativeID;
    END IF;
    INSERT INTO tpm_initiatives_hist( INITIATIVEID, NAME, ACTIVE, SORTORDER, SHORTNAME, PROJECTTYPEID, 
                                      OPERATIONTYPE, CHANGEUSERNAME, CHANGEDATE, COMMENT )
      VALUES( :new.initiativeID, :new.name, :new.active, :new.sortOrder, :new.shortName, :new.projectTypeID, 
              'U', USER, SYSDATE, l_comment );
  ELSIF( deleting )
  THEN
    INSERT INTO tpm_initiatives_hist( INITIATIVEID, NAME, ACTIVE, SORTORDER, SHORTNAME, PROJECTTYPEID, 
                                      OPERATIONTYPE, CHANGEUSERNAME, CHANGEDATE )
      VALUES( :old.initiativeID, :old.name, :old.active, :old.sortOrder, :old.shortName, :old.projectTypeID, 
              'D', USER, SYSDATE );
  END IF;
END;

Then you can query TPM_INITIATIVES_HIST to see all the changes that had been made to a particular row over time. So you can see if the primary key values are changing or if someone is just changing the non-key fields. Ideally, you may have additional columns that you can add to the history table to help tracking the changes (i.e. perhaps there is something from V$SESSION that might be useful).

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Are you saying if another table has a FK constraint on INITIATIVEID, then Oracle will not allow that key to change? I will check if these constraints exist, and add them if not. I do like the trigger idea, it seems quick and easy. The View idea, I agree, would be the best long term fix but I'm very nervous about applying this sort of change live on a production server. I guess I could test it on one of the staging servers first though. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 18:42
    
@Mike Christensen - I expanded a bit on the foreign key constraint bit. Oracle doesn't allow you to orphan a child row by changing the parent row's key. –  Justin Cave Nov 30 '11 at 18:49
1  
Oh gotcha yea. I don't believe these rows were orphaned, but what we were seeing is a child row would point to master A, then all of a sudden it would be pointing the master B (which has the same key as master A did), and master A is now mysteriously vanished. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 18:58
    
@MikeChristensen - Then why do you believe that the problem is that the primary key is changing? Wouldn't it seem more likely that someone was updating the non-key data in the row to change it from A to B? –  Justin Cave Nov 30 '11 at 19:20
    
This is another possibility. I've looked at the code that updates these records and it all looks fine. It usually doesn't happen, so it's some race condition or intermittent thing. That's why my goal right now is to eliminate as many possibilities as I can, and perhaps the root cause will eventually surface. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 19:33

Hide the table behind a view and make the update trigger update everything but the column you want to protect

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Unfortunately this is way too messy of a change and won't get approved for a production database. We need a quick hot-fix. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 18:27
    
Why? - you Alter table <name> Rename to <temp_Name> and then Create View on the old name so everything is transparent to the rest of the app –  Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Nov 30 '11 at 18:34
    
Then how do I handle UPDATEs, DELETEs and INSERTs with the view? All the app code uses raw SQL against the old table name. –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 18:36
    
You make the view updateable and You create INSTEAD OF triggers for the view for update all the fields except the one you don't want. –  Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Nov 30 '11 at 18:54
    
Ok, that makes sense. Thanks! –  Mike Christensen Nov 30 '11 at 19:03

The second option might be better. If you have a logging table/file, you could try writing a message with as much diagnostic information as you can, every time there's an attempt to change the value.

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