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I have an operation I'd like to run for each row of a data frame, changing one column. I'm an apply/ddply/sqldf man, but I'll use loops when they make sense, and I think this is one of those times. This case is tricky because the column to changes depends on information that changes by row; depending on information in one cell, I should make a change to only one of ten other cells in that row. With 75 columns and 20000 rows, the operation takes 10 minutes, when every other operation in my script takes 0-5 seconds, ten seconds max. I've stripped my problem down to the very simple test case below.

n <- 20000
t.df <- data.frame(matrix(1:5000, ncol=10, nrow=n) )
system.time(
 for (i in 1:nrow(t.df)) {
 t.df[i,(t.df[i,1]%%10 + 1)] <- 99
 }
)

This takes 70 seconds with ten columns, and 360 when ncol=50. That's crazy. Are loops the wrong approach? Is there a better, more efficient way to do this?

I already tried initializing the nested term (t.df[i,1]%%10 + 1) as a list outside the for loop. It saves about 30 seconds (out of 10 minutes) but makes the example code above more complicated. So it helps, but its not the solution.

My current best idea came while preparing this test case. For me, only 10 of the columns are relevant (and 75-11 columns are irrelevant). Since the run times depend so much on the number of columns, I can just run the above operation on a data frame that excludes irrelevant columns. That will get me down to just over a minute. But is "for loop with nested indices" even the best way to think about my problem?

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3  
+1 for a pared-down test case, clearly delineated problem, and reproducible example. –  Ari B. Friedman Nov 30 '11 at 19:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Using row and col seems less complicated to me:

t.df[col(t.df) == (row(t.df) %% 10) + 1]  <- 99

I think Tommy's is still faster, but using row and col might be easier to understand.

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sweet! I feel like it'll take me a while to grok this, but I aspire to think this way. –  enfascination Nov 30 '11 at 19:53
    
I've spent the past hour playing with all the answers. This one is my favorite: its on the some order of magnitude as the other approaches, and it seems to generalize best to data frames and other data types (like strings): t.df <- data.frame(matrix(as.character(1:5000), ncol=10, nrow=n)) t.df[col(t.df) == (row(t.df) %% 10) + 1] <- "99" Now I just have to learn how to think in those functions. That said, more matrices for me (@JD Long). –  enfascination Nov 30 '11 at 20:14
    
FYI, yes, not as fast as Tommy's. It takes about 4x as long with a matrix. In fact, if you don't make it a matrix first it's not even as fast as JD Long's simple variation of the matrix type. If t.df is a matrix it is faster than JD Long's solution. –  John Nov 30 '11 at 20:54

Another option for when you do need mixed column types (and so you can't use matrix) is := in data.table. Example from ?":=" :

require(data.table)
m = matrix(1,nrow=100000,ncol=100)
DF = as.data.frame(m)
DT = as.data.table(m)    
system.time(for (i in 1:1000) DF[i,1] <- i)
    # 591 seconds 
system.time(for (i in 1:1000) DT[i,V1:=i])
    # 1.16 seconds  ( 509 times faster )
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UPDATE: Added the matrix version of Tommy's solution to the benchmarking exercise.

You can vectorize it. Here is my solution and a comparison with the loop

n <- 20000
t.df <- (matrix(1:5000, ncol=10, nrow=n))

f_ramnath <- function(x){
  idx <- x[,1] %% 10 + 1
  x[cbind(1:NROW(x), idx)] <- 99  
  return(x)
}

f_long <- function(t.df){
  for (i in 1:nrow(t.df)) {
    t.df[i,(t.df[i,1]%%10 + 1)] <- 99
  }
  return(t.df)
}

f_joran <- function(t.df){
  t.df[col(t.df) == (row(t.df) %% 10) + 1]  <- 99
  return(t.df)
}

f_tommy <- function(t.df){
  t2.df <- t.df
  # Create a logical matrix with TRUE wherever the replacement should happen
  m <- array(FALSE, dim=dim(t2.df))
  m[cbind(seq_len(nrow(t2.df)), t2.df[,1]%%10L + 1L)] <- TRUE
  t2.df[m] <- 99
  return(t2.df)
}

f_tommy_mat <- function(m){
  m[cbind(seq_len(nrow(m)), m[,1]%%10L + 1L)] <- 99
}

To compare the performance of the different approaches, we can use rbenchmark.

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(f_long(t.df), f_ramnath(t.df), f_joran(t.df), f_tommy(t.df), 
  f_tommy_mat(t.df), replications = 20,  order = 'relative',
  columns = c('test', 'elapsed', 'relative')

               test elapsed  relative
5 f_tommy_mat(t.df)   0.135  1.000000
2   f_ramnath(t.df)   0.172  1.274074
4     f_tommy(t.df)   0.311  2.303704
3     f_joran(t.df)   0.705  5.222222
1      f_long(t.df)   2.411 17.859259
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nice illustration of rbenchmark. I had not used that before. –  JD Long Nov 30 '11 at 19:23
    
it is a great tool, and i have replaced system.time with it. it does multiple replications, which provides a better comparison, and moreover does a nice summary comparing the results. –  Ramnath Nov 30 '11 at 19:26
1  
you people are wizards. –  enfascination Nov 30 '11 at 20:05
    
@Ramnath - I object a bit to the f_tommy version: My first version was very similar to yours (and posted earlier :-) and assumed a matrix argument. The f_tommy version works directly on a data.frame and thus solves a different problem (the problem actually asked). It also makes an extra copy in order not to overwrite the original. None of the other solutions do that, so it compares unfavorable. –  Tommy Nov 30 '11 at 21:05
    
@Tommy. you are absolutely right. it is not an apples to apples comparison. i have updated the benchmarking exercise with your original matrix solution. –  Ramnath Nov 30 '11 at 22:28

@JD Long is right that if t.df can be represented as a matrix, things will be much faster.

...And then you can actually vectorize the whole thing so that it is lightning fast:

n <- 20000
t.df <- data.frame(matrix(1:5000, ncol=10, nrow=n) )
system.time({
  m <- as.matrix(t.df)
  m[cbind(seq_len(nrow(m)), m[,1]%%10L + 1L)] <- 99
  t2.df <- as.data.frame(m)
}) # 0.00 secs

Unfortunately, the matrix indexing I use here does not seem to work on a data.frame.

EDIT A variant where I create a logical matrix to index works on data.frame, and is almost as fast:

n <- 20000
t.df <- data.frame(matrix(1:5000, ncol=10, nrow=n) )
system.time({
  t2.df <- t.df

  # Create a logical matrix with TRUE wherever the replacement should happen
  m <- array(FALSE, dim=dim(t2.df))
  m[cbind(seq_len(nrow(t2.df)), t2.df[,1]%%10L + 1L)] <- TRUE

  t2.df[m] <- 99
}) # 0.01 secs
share|improve this answer
    
You can always just use row and col, as in my answer! Yours is still faster, though. –  joran Nov 30 '11 at 19:20
    
+1 Hooray for matrix indexing! –  Aaron Nov 30 '11 at 19:41
    
yeah, sweet. I didn't realize what compromises I was making by working with data frames. –  enfascination Nov 30 '11 at 19:57

It seems the real bottleneck is having the data in the form of a data.frame. I assume that in your real problem you have a compelling reason to use a data.frame. Any way to convert your data in such a way that it can remain in a matrix?

By the way, great question and a very good example.

Here's an illustration of how much faster loops are on matrices than on data.frames:

> n <- 20000
> t.df <- (matrix(1:5000, ncol=10, nrow=n) )
> system.time(
+   for (i in 1:nrow(t.df)) {
+     t.df[i,(t.df[i,1]%%10 + 1)] <- 99
+   }
+ )
   user  system elapsed 
  0.084   0.001   0.084 
> 
> n <- 20000
> t.df <- data.frame(matrix(1:5000, ncol=10, nrow=n) )
> system.time(
+   for (i in 1:nrow(t.df)) {
+     t.df[i,(t.df[i,1]%%10 + 1)] <- 99
+   }
+   )
   user  system elapsed 
 31.543  57.664  89.224 
share|improve this answer
1  
Holy hell. That got me down from 15 minutes to 0.15 seconds. Astonishing. Loop vs. apply was the wrong question; its data frame vs matrix. Thanks! –  enfascination Nov 30 '11 at 19:49
4  
I caught Josh Ulrich once when he was in Chicago and pulled him into the office to review some of my code. I thought for sure he was going to show me all this fancy kung foo to make my code faster. He shrugged and said, in his calm way, "try using matrix more and data.frames less" and then we went and had coffee. Best. Code Review. Evar. :) –  JD Long Nov 30 '11 at 19:58

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