Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to center a 'grid' of elements that—when resized—adjusts to center itself.

Like this:

 ___________________
|                   |
|    [] [] [] []    |
|    [] [] [] []    |
|    [] [] []       |
 -------------------
 ________________
|                |
|    [] [] []    |
|    [] [] []    |
|    [] [] []    |
|    [] []       |
 ----------------
 _____________
|             |
|    [] []    |
|    [] []    |
|    [] []    |
|    [] []    |
|    [] []    |
|    []       |
 -------------

I've tried setting a max-width, but that leads to this problem when resized:

 ________________
|                |
|    [] [] []    |
|    [] [] []    |
|    [] [] []    |
|    [] []       |
 ----------------
 _____________
|             |
| [] []       |
| [] []       |
| [] []       |
| [] []       |
| [] []       |
| []          |
 -------------

I do not consider using media queries and setting hard widths (or even max-widths) for every configuration a real solution.

I am open to CSS3 as long as it degrades gracefully, and would like to avoid javascript.

Edit: Adding non-semantic elements is also a deal breaker, a container div or something would be passable but not ideal.

The markup should be as follows:

 <ul>
      <li>...</li>
      <li>...</li>
      <li>...</li>
 </ul>

Here is a demo to get you started.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
I really don't think there is a way to do what you are asking without using some javascript or jQuery –  CBRRacer Nov 30 '11 at 19:57
    
Added a solution based on your new requirements. –  ScottS Nov 30 '11 at 21:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's still a little vague as to what your exact requirements are for centering (as in, all your illustrations above show an even number of elements, so I don't know what you expect for odd number. In your fiddle, I just added a text-align: center to the ul and achieved a centering effect ( http://jsfiddle.net/nR9Mk/1/ ), but I don't know if it is behaving as you desire.

Update: If you are only dealing with even numbers and you want them to remain grouped by two's, then this would work: http://jsfiddle.net/nR9Mk/8/.

ROUND 2: Based on your revealed "odd number" requirements, I have come up with a solution that works. Note: 1) it does require some extra HTML markup, 2) you have to set some type of practical limit to how wide you want to go and still get the effect. Here is the code with the "buffer" elements revealed by an outline and here is it with the outline removed.

ROUND 3: I know you already accepted my answer, but I was already working on this, so I figured I would offer it anyway. Based on your deal breaker comment, here is a modified plan that may be useful for you (or someone else). It is a hybrid -- "sometimes" it pushes the elements left (usually when it would be most awkward to not) and sometimes lets them stay "off column" but centered. To keep it from ever looking plain "weird" it is given a max-width of six columns wide.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my examples with odd numbers. The placement of the last row is not ideal and I am still looking for other solutions, but thank you. –  bookcasey Nov 30 '11 at 20:18
    
Thanks. That definitely will require a different solution. –  ScottS Nov 30 '11 at 20:21
    
Scott, first of all, thank you so much for your input. +1, so you know. However, the extra elements are a deal breaker, I apologize for not specifying this in my answer. I also observed this bug. Thanks again. –  bookcasey Dec 1 '11 at 4:13
    
That's not really a "bug." As I said in my answer, you would have to set a practical limit to just how wide to go and still get the effect. Adding extra "buffers" would solve the "bug." May I ask why extra elements are a "deal breaker"? –  ScottS Dec 1 '11 at 11:56
    
I think I can live with the centering in your original solution. Adding extra li with nothing in them is a deal breaker because they are not list items, they are purely presentational. In the end, how different is using li like that and using tables for layout? It's important to describe the content semantically. –  bookcasey Dec 1 '11 at 15:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.