Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted to make a map with my own struct 'Point2' as key, however I am getting errors and I don't know what's causing it, since I declared an 'operator<' for the Point2 struct.

Code:

std::map<Point2, Prop*> m_Props_m;
std::map<Point2, Point2> m_Orders;

struct Point2
{
    unsigned int Point2::x;
    unsigned int Point2::y;

Point2& Point2::operator= (const Point2& b)
    {
        if (this != &b) {
            x = b.x;
            y = b.y;
        }
        return *this;
    }

    bool Point2::operator== (const Point2& b)
    {
        return ( x == b.x && y == b.y);
    }

    bool Point2::operator< (const Point2& b)
    {
        return ( x+y < b.x+b.y );
    }

    bool Point2::operator> (const Point2& b)
    {
        return ( x+y > b.x+b.y );
    }
};

Error:

1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\xfunctional(125): error C2678: binary '<' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const Point2' (or there is no acceptable conversion)
1>c:\testing\project\point2.h(34): could be 'bool Point2::operator <(const Point2 &)'
1>while trying to match the argument list '(const Point2, const Point2)'
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\xfunctional(124) : while compiling class template member function 'bool std::less<_Ty>::operator ()(const _Ty &,const _Ty &) const'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Ty=Point2
1>          ]

Can anyone see what's causing the problem?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

std::map expects a const version of operator <:

// note the final const on this line:
bool Point2::operator< (const Point2& b) const
{
    return ( x+y < b.x+b.y );
}

It doesn't make sense to have non-const versions of operator==, operator>, those should be const as well.

As ildjarn points out below, this is a clear case where you can implement these operators as free functions instead of member functions. Generally, you should prefer these operators as free functions unless they need to be member functions. Here's an example:

bool operator<(const Point2& lhs, const Point2& rhs)
{
    return (lhs.x + lhs.y) < (rhs.x + rhs.y);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That solved it.. thanks! –  xcrypt Nov 30 '11 at 19:00
    
Better yet, they shouldn't be defined as class members at all, but rather as free functions... –  ildjarn Nov 30 '11 at 19:20
    
agreed. Free functions are more appropriate in this specific example, but I was just posting the answer to help the OP. –  Chad Nov 30 '11 at 19:22
    
Not criticizing your answer, just making an observation. :-] –  ildjarn Nov 30 '11 at 19:33

The operator< should be defined as const, in fact so should your other comparison operators, and in general, any method that doesn't mutate its class:

bool Point2::operator== (const Point2& b) const
{
    return ( x == b.x && y == b.y);
}

bool Point2::operator< (const Point2& b) const
{
    return ( x+y < b.x+b.y );
}

bool Point2::operator> (const Point2& b) const
{
    return ( x+y > b.x+b.y );
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.