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I am trying to use the wikimapia api for finding venues of specific cities or places given their longitude and latidute. There isn't much of some documentation, but I suppose that it would just be an http request. Now, the problem I have is about the specific ulr. I tried this one:

http://api.wikimapia.org/?function=search
&key= myKey
&q=lat= theLatidute
&lon= theLongitude
&format=json

but it doesn't seem to work. Any help will be appreciated..

share|improve this question
    
&q=lat= theLatidute seems a little odd, did you typo it? –  Polynomial Nov 30 '11 at 19:23
    
sorry for the mistake, I tried to edit it but you were too fast :) yes seems a little odd doesn't it? –  pr_prog_84 Nov 30 '11 at 19:25
    
You can still edit the question :) –  Polynomial Nov 30 '11 at 19:27
    
But i don't know what is the correct, u see... :S –  pr_prog_84 Nov 30 '11 at 19:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The search API requires that you set a search location (long and lat) as well as the name of something to search for that location.

For example, to find a train station near a particular coordinate:

http://api.wikimapia.org/?function=search&key=[key]&q=Train+Station&lat=[latitude]&lon=[longitude]&format=json

If you're just trying to find a list of objects that are close to a coordinate, without a search term, you need to use the box API with small offsets:

 http://api.wikimapia.org/?function=box&key=[key]&lon_min=[lon_min]&lat_min=[lat_min]&lon_max=[lon_max]&lat_max=[lat_max]&format=json

If you only want to input one set of coordinates, you can compute lon_min, lon_max, lat_min and lat_max like this:

// 1 degree latitude is roughly 111km, 0.001 degrees lat is about 100m
var lat_min = latitude - 0.001;
var lat_max = latitude + 0.001;

// 1 degree longitude is not a static value
// it varies in terms of physical distance based on the current latitude
// to compute it in meters, we do cos(latitude) * 111000
var meters_per_longdeg = Math.cos((3.141592 / 180) * latitude) * 111000;

// then we can work out how much longitude constitutes a change of ~100m
var range = 100 / meters_per_longdeg;

var long_min = longitude - range;
var long_max = longitude + range;
share|improve this answer
    
made my day! thank you very much :) –  pr_prog_84 Nov 30 '11 at 20:13
    
tried it and works like a charm! –  pr_prog_84 Nov 30 '11 at 20:34
    
Glad to be of help :) –  Polynomial Nov 30 '11 at 21:46

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