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I want to update a table in a statement that has several joins. While I know the order of joins doesn't really matter (unless you you are using optimizer hints) I ordered them a certain way to be most intuitive to read. However, this results in the table I want to update not being the one I start with, and I am having trouble updating it.

A dummy example of what I'd like to do is something like:

UPDATE b
FROM tableA a
JOIN tableB b
   ON a.a_id = b.a_id
JOIN tableC c
   ON b.b_id = c.b_id
SET b.val = a.val+c.val
WHERE a.val > 10
    AND c.val > 10;

There are many posts about updating with joins here however they always have table being updated first. I know this is possible in SQL Server and hopefully its possible in MySQL Too!

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You need to put the SET b.val = a.val+c.val before FROM .... See stackoverflow.com/questions/2334712/… –  Gerben Nov 30 '11 at 19:29
    
This example has SET after the from, and that examples updates the first table in the join order. I would like to update a table in the middle of the join order. –  Zugwalt Nov 30 '11 at 19:36
    
That shouldn't matter. Even if it did you could just change the order of the joins (tableB b JOIN tableA a ON a.a_id = b.a_id). –  Gerben Nov 30 '11 at 19:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The multi-table UPDATE syntax in MySQL is different from Microsoft SQL Server. You don't need to say which table(s) you're updating, that's implicit in your SET clause.

UPDATE tableA a
JOIN tableB b
   ON a.a_id = b.a_id
JOIN tableC c
   ON b.b_id = c.b_id
SET b.val = a.val+c.val
WHERE a.val > 10
    AND c.val > 10;

There is no FROM clause.

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This link should give you the syntax that MySQL needs and here is an example. Why do you need to join the two tables? is it to limit the records updated? I am asking because you can also do something like the following:

update B set B.x=<value>
    where 
B.<value> is in(
    select A.y 
      from A left outer join B on A.<value>=B.<value>
)
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That examples updates the first table in the join order. I would like to update a table in the middle of the join order. –  Zugwalt Nov 30 '11 at 19:36
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You have the ordering of the statements wrong. You can read up on the syntax here (I know, it's pretty hard to read.

UPDATE b
   SET b.val = a.val+c.val
  FROM tableA a
  JOIN tableB b
    ON a.a_id = b.a_id
  JOIN tableC c
    ON b.b_id = c.b_id
 WHERE a.val > 10
   AND c.val > 10;
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