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I'm designing an API that exposes a cancellable Task, and want to make sure I have designed it correctly. Is there a standard pattern for exposing Tasks (maybe something similar to the APM BeginXxx/EndXxx pattern)? Any suggestions to improve? See MyAPI.Run

Does Test2 demonstrate the best way to run many MyAPI.Run tasks in parallel?

public static class MyAPI
{
    public static Task<MyResult> Run( CancellationToken token ) {
        // lazily create Task, so as to include the specified CancellationToken
        return new Task<MyResult>( MyPrivateAsyncMethod, token, token );
    }

    private static MyResult MyPrivateAsyncMethod( object state ) {
        CancellationToken ct = (CancellationToken)state;
        ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        return new MyResult();
    }
}

public static class TestMyAPI
{
    // User can start the Task directly
    public static void Test1() {
        CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
        MyAPI.Run( cts.Token )
            .ContinueWith( task => Console.WriteLine( task.Result.ToString() ) )
            .Start();
    }

    // User must wrap in new Tasks to get Parent/Child relationship
    public static void Test2() {
        CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
        Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
        {
            var childTasks = new[] {
                Task.Factory.StartNew<MyResult>( () => MyAPI.Run( cts.Token ).Result, cts.Token, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent, TaskScheduler.Default ),
                Task.Factory.StartNew<MyResult>( () => MyAPI.Run( cts.Token ).Result, cts.Token, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent, TaskScheduler.Default )
            };

            Task.Factory
                .ContinueWhenAll<MyResult>( childTasks, tasks => { foreach( var task in tasks ) task.ToString(); } )
                .Start();
        }, cts.Token );
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a couple of issues in your implementation that I would consider changing.

First off, this method:

public static Task<MyResult> Run( CancellationToken token ) {
    // lazily create Task, so as to include the specified CancellationToken
    return new Task<MyResult>( MyPrivateAsyncMethod, token, token );
}

This is dangerous - The convention for APIs returning Task or Task<T> is to return a "hot" Task. This means that you should design your APIs to always return a task which is already running.

This is to prevent problems, like the one you have in your code above:

    MyAPI.Run( cts.Token )
        .ContinueWith( task => Console.WriteLine( task.Result.ToString() ) )
        .Start();

If you look at this, it can be rewritten as:

    Task<MyResult> original = MyAPI.Run( cts.Token );
    Task second = original.ContinueWith( task => Console.WriteLine( task.Result.ToString() ) );
    second.Start();

Here, you're actually calling Start on the wrong task - not the original task, but the continuation... A typical approach would make "Run" return a hot task, which would allow you to write this as:

    MyAPI.Run( cts.Token )
         .ContinueWith( task => Console.WriteLine( task.Result.ToString() ) );

Again, this rears its head in your second example, as well. You can Task.Factory.StartNew, and have it look at MyAPI.Run, but never actually call Start on the tasks inside... As such, those tasks will never start and never complete.

Second, I would recommend using the new conventions for naming that are showing up in .NET 4.5, just for future proofing. This is to make routines that return Task or Task<T> have the name with an Async suffix. In this case, it would be MyAPI.RunAsync. This will allow your code to look like the framework code that will crop up in the next release of .NET.

Finally, in regards to your last question:

Does Test2 demonstrate the best way to run many MyAPI.Run tasks in parallel?

Actually, if you make the Run method return a running task, this becomes far simpler:

public static void Test2() {
    CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    var task1 = MyAPI.RunAsync(cts.Token);
    var task2 = MyAPI.RunAsync(cts.Token);

    Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll<MyResult>(
       new[] { task1, task2 }, 
       tasks => { 
           foreach( var task in tasks ) task.ToString(); 
       }, 
       cts.Token);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Regarding your Test2 rewrite, what happens to exception handling? Specifically, with a Parent/Child arrangement, I would Try the parent and catch an AggergateException of anything thrown by the children. How would this work in your rewrite? –  nmarler Nov 30 '11 at 20:54
    
@nmarler You'd have to handle it in the continuation - you can explicitly wrap a Try/catch around a call to Wait in the continuation to handle errors, if needed. –  Reed Copsey Nov 30 '11 at 21:03
    
I'm mulling over the concept of only returning 'hot' Tasks. In my app I have a "SequenceManager" object that's responsible for running a handful of Tasks that live in other classes. When the SequenceManager is initialized, it was my intention to compose a Task of sub-object Tasks in a certain arrangement (some sequential to each other, some async). Then, at some point in the future, this "master" Task could be run. I think now that SequenceManager init should be simplified, and instead expose a RunAsync method that will compose the sub-RunAsyncs on the fly. Thanks, your advice is very helpful –  nmarler Nov 30 '11 at 21:54
    
@nmarler If you want to return something, but have it be a "cold task", I would consider returning a Func<Task<T>>. This would make it obvious, and allow you to execute the delegate to start and get your actual Task. –  Reed Copsey Nov 30 '11 at 21:56
    
One more question about returning hot Tasks: what is the convention if the Task cannot be started? Return null? Throw? If convention is to throw (that's my guess), should the method throw individual exception, e.g., ArgumentNullException, or instead wrap in an AggregateException? Thanks –  nmarler Dec 2 '11 at 19:17

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