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Can someone explain me how exactly a pipeline multiplier works in VHDL? I understand it multiplies serially but I can't seem to get the logic down.

For example when I am multiplying 1101 and 1010, the product should be 8 binary digits but we are multiplying a 4-bit number with a 1 bit number so how exactly do we get the end result? I am attaching the code I have but I don't understand how it functions. I'd appreciate help in learning the logic behind the code.

I apologize if the problem seems vague. Thanks for the help!

library IEEE;
use IEEE.STD_LOGIC_1164.ALL;
--use IEEE.NUMERIC_STD.ALL;
use IEEE.STD_LOGIC_ARITH.ALL;



entity pipe_mult is
generic (N: natural := 4);
port( x : in  std_logic_vector(N-1 downto 0);
      y: in std_logic;
      z : out  std_logic;
      ck, reset: in std_logic);
end pipe_mult;


architecture struc of pipe_mult is

component pe
port( x_i,y_i,c_in,ps_in: in std_logic;
y_out,c_out,ps_out: out std_logic;
ck, reset: in std_logic);
end component;

component DFF
port( x, reset, ck: in std_logic;
Q: out std_logic);
end component;

-- wires declaration
signal yy, c, ps: std_logic_vector(n-1 downto 0);
signal w: std_logic;
type debounce_state is (rdy, pulse, not_rdy);
signal d_n_s : debounce_state;
signal en: std_logic;


begin
D: DFF port map(w, reset, ck, ps(n-1));

g1: for i in 0 to n-1 generate
g2: if i=0 generate
cell: pe port map(x(i), yy(i), c(i), ps(i), yy(i+1), c(i+1), z, ck, reset);
end generate g2;
g3: if i > 0 and i < n-1 generate
cell: pe port map(x(i), yy(i), c(i), ps(i), yy(i+1), c(i+1), ps(i-1), ck, reset);
end generate g3;
g4: if i=n-1 generate
cell: pe port map(x(i), yy(i), c(i), ps(i), open, w,ps(i-1),ck,reset);
end generate g4;
end generate g1;


-- Wire Input Ports

yy(0) <= y;
c(0) <= '0';


end struc;
#
library IEEE;
use IEEE.STD_LOGIC_1164.ALL;
--use IEEE.NUMERIC_STD.ALL;
use IEEE.STD_LOGIC_ARITH.ALL;


entity pe is
port(    x_i,y_i,c_in,ps_in: in std_logic;
         y_out,c_out,ps_out: out std_logic;
                           ck, reset: in std_logic);
end pe;

Architecture beh of pe is
signal tmp1, tmp2, tmp3,a,sum,carry: std_logic;
begin
-- synchronous state storages
process(ck)
begin
if ck='1' and ck'event then
   if reset='1' then tmp1 <= '0'; tmp2 <= '0'; tmp3 <= '0';
     else
       tmp1 <= Y_i;
       tmp2 <= carry;
       tmp3 <= sum;
   end if;
end if;
end process;

-- concurrrent statements for wiring
carry <= (c_in and a) or (a and ps_in) or (ps_in and c_in);
sum <= ps_in xor c_in xor a;
a <= x_i and y_i;
y_out <= tmp1;
c_out <= tmp2;
ps_out <= tmp3;
end beh;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

OK - looks like you have to draw out a truth table for the pe.

What I suspect is going on is that it's doing wired shifts and adds:

[a3 a2 a1 a0 * b3 b2 b1 b0] will be something like:

                                 a3.b0   a2.b0   a1.b0   a0.b0
+                        a3.b1   a2.b1   a1.b1   a0.b1    '0'
+                a3.b2   a2.b2   a1.b2   a0.b2    '0'     '0'
+        a3.b3   a2.b3   a1.b3   a0.b3   ' 0'     '0'     '0'
+         c5      c4      c3      c2      c1      c0    
--------------------------------------------------------------
   c6  &  p6   &  p5   &  p4   &  p3   &  p2   &  p1   & a0.b0 

Where '.' is an AND. Note each carry being propagated from the previous stage.

This may explain the highly structural nature of the code - which I will admit to not wanting to analyse to deeply.

share|improve this answer

Phew! That took some unravelling. Take a big fish, and SLAP whoever wrote that code with it. (Didn't sound like it was you)

It looks like the pe has a register between y_out and Y_i, so the whole block is expecting these values to be presented to it over the N (=4) clock cycles it takes to operate.

x(3 downto 0), y(3)
x(3 downto 0), y(2)
x(3 downto 0), y(1)
x(3 downto 0), y(0)

This is an example of a 'Systolic Array Multiplier' (Systolic refers to the data being pumped round the array, like the heart pumps blood around the body). They were quite popular in the '90s due to low gate count, and they avoided the problems of long carry chains. Systolic arrays aren't that popular today because of low performance (N clocks to get a result) and power consumption (lot's of registers latching new values every cycle). Today we're more likely to want the performance and spend the gates on look-ahead carry. I haven't touched a systolic multiplier since '95.

share|improve this answer
    
Good work, I admire your tenacity there. SA's are amusing but ultimately useless. –  user1070420 Dec 2 '11 at 10:25
1  
They're an architecture worth knowing about, but mainly to know what you can do, and why you don't. –  Paul S Dec 2 '11 at 17:16

You can unroll the generate loops and draw out the pipe, but without the architecture for the pe component itself, it won't make any sense.

There are many problems in this code:

  • z is a single bit
  • z is driven off the zeroth stage of the pipe and not the last
  • w is undriven and is an input to the final stage

I think you should draw it out and reassess it.

share|improve this answer
    
I added the code of the ProcessingElement (pe) –  dawnoflife Nov 30 '11 at 20:36

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