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I have a problem creating a flip card with a scrolling element on each side with HTML, CSS and JS for Mobile Safari on iOS 5.

If you scroll when the card is flipped or not flipped, the scrolling always happens on the element on the back. The scrolling never works on the front.

I have the following code:

HTML

<ol id="front" onclick="flip();">
  <li>Front</li>
  ...
  <li>Front</li>
</ol>
<ol id="back" class="flipped" onclick="flip();">
  <li>Back</li>
  ...
  <li>Back</li>
</ol>

JS

function flip(){
  var front = document.getElementById("front");
  var back = document.getElementById("back");
  if (front.className != "flipped") {
    front.className = "flipped";
    back.className = "";
  } else {
    front.className = "";
    back.className = "flipped";
  }
}

CSS

#front, #back {
 position: absolute;
 width: 400px;
 height: 400px;
 overflow: scroll;
 -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;
 -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
 -webkit-transition: all 500ms linear;
}

#front.flipped {
 -webkit-transform: perspective(100px) rotateY(180deg);
}

#back.flipped {
 -webkit-transform: perspective(100px) rotateY(-180deg);
}

Here's the code in action (try it with iOS 5): http://jsfiddle.net/sennevdb/bDh5b/embedded/result

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2 Answers 2

Sorry this isn't a robust answer (don't have time to code/test), but I would imagine the problem is you're only updating transforms... which doesn't affect where the browser actually thinks the elements are.

You could consider using a webkitTransitionEnd event which makes the z-index of the front-facing card 10, and the back 0.

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This issue still persists in iOS6 as well, at least in my case where I have to scrollable div's next to each other and when I perform a transform transition, the scrolling doesn't work.

My solution was to rewrite at least one of the div's after the transition by using a simple jQuery statement:

html.on('webkitTransitionEnd', '.one-of-my-scrollers', function() {  
        setTimeout(function() {  
            var d = $('.one-of-my-scrollers');  
            d.parent().append(d);  
    }, 0);  
});

This somehow triggers a reflow in the browser causing the scrolling to work again properly afterwards.

Another way of doing is by disabling the overflow on an element and enabling it right away again like:

html.on('webkitTransitionEnd', '.one-of-my-scrollers', function() {  
    setTimeout(function() {  
        var d = $('.one-of-my-scrollers');  
        d.css('overflow', 'hidden');  
        setTimeout(function() {  
            d.css('overflow', 'auto');  
        }, 0);  
    }, 0);  
});

I call these things the ugly truth which we shouldn't want to be doing...

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