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So, please consider the following situation

I have a super class of type "Shapes" and classes "Box", "Circle" and "Arrow" that inherit Shapes. I have a list of Shapes elsewhere that can contain members any of these types. I need to enumerate through the list and draw out each shape. The problem is that each shape is drawn differently, hence I have:

void Draw(Box b) {}

void Draw(Square s) {}

void Draw(Circle c) {}

The problem is that when I enumerate through the list, each element returned is of the type Shape (since the list is of type Shape) even though its actual type could be Box. Due to this, none of the overloads are recognized as being correct.

One thought I had was to create a temp object and declare it of the actual type of the list element. So, lets assume list[i] is of the type Circle

object o = Type.GetType(Convert.ToString(list[i].GetType()));
o = list[i];

But this still doesn't work since now the compiler recognizes the type of 'o' to be Object instead of Circle!

How can I get around this problem?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Create an abstract Draw method in the Shape class. Override it in each derived class. Let the specific shapes draw themselves.


Example:

public interface IDrawingSurface {
    // All your favorite graphics primitives
}

public abstract class Shape {
    public abstract void Draw();

    protected IDrawingSurface Surface {get;set;}

    public Shape(IDrawingSurface surface) {
        Surface = surface;
    }
}

public class Box {
    public Box(IDrawingSurface surface) : base(surface) {}
    public virtual void Draw(){ Surface.Something();... }
}

public class Square {
    public Square(IDrawingSurface surface) : base(surface) {}
    public virtual void Draw(){ Surface.Something();... }
}

public class Circle {
    public Circle(IDrawingSurface surface) : base(surface) {}
    public virtual void Draw(){ Surface.Something();... }
}
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1  
+1. or use an interface, like IDrawable, and have sub-classes that can be drawn implement that interface. –  32bitkid Nov 30 '11 at 20:42
    
This was my second thought, and it would definitely work. My pet peeve with this is that any control I create would have to pass in a reference to the pictureBox to draw on to. I was hoping to get a way of getting away from it. –  Rishi Nov 30 '11 at 21:14
    
Generalize the PictureBox to an IDrawingSurface interface, then at least you won't be dependent on a particular drawing technology. You can also pass that interface into the constructor of the shape so that it need not be passed in every Draw call. A shape composed of other shapes could pass it's own IDrawingSurface reference to the component shapes, to say, "draw to the same place I draw to". –  John Saunders Nov 30 '11 at 22:29

A better solution could be to have an abstract function on shape Draw() and then override that function in Box, Circle and Sqaure.

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Why don't you make Draw a virtual method on Shapes and then override it on each of your derived classes? Then you can do this:

List<Shapes> shapes = ... get your list of shapes somewhere ...

foreach (var shape in shapes) {
    shape.Draw();
}

The right virtual method will be called on the specific derived class. This is the textbook case that polymorphism is meant for.

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I would personally use an interface as suggested, but in case you didn't have access to who is calling you (such as third party .dll) then you can accept an argument of type object:

    /// <summary>
    /// Draw any type of object if the objec type is supported.
    /// Circles, Squares, etc.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="objectToDraw"></param>
    public void Draw(object objectToDraw)
    {
        // get the type of object
        string type = objectToDraw.GetType().ToString();

        switch(type)
        {
            case "Circle":

                // cast the objectToDraw as a Circle
                Circle circle = objectToDraw as Circle;

                // if the cast was successful
                if (circle != null)
                {
                    // draw the circle
                    circle.Draw();
                }

                // required
                break;

            case "Square":

                // cast the object as a square
                Square square = objectToDraw as Square;

                // if the square exists
                if (square != null)
                {
                    // draw the square
                    square.Draw();
                }

                // required
                break;

            default:

                // raise an error
                throw new Exception("Object Type Not Supported in Draw method");
        }
    }
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public interface IShape
{
     public void Draw();
}

public class Circle : IShape
{
    public void Draw()
    {
      do somethig shape specific
    }

}

List<IShape> shapes

foreach (IShape shape in shapes)
{
     shape.Draw();
}
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void Draw(Shapes s) 
{ 
   if (s is Circle) 
   {
      Draw((Circle)s);
   }
}

and so on.

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While you can do this, it's much more expensive than doing the virtual method approach I suggested in my previous answer. The approach you have here requires reflection to dispatch to the right method, which will be slow. –  triangle_man Nov 30 '11 at 20:43
    
sure but its another approach if the OP does not want to change his shapes. –  Daniel A. White Nov 30 '11 at 20:44
    
Thanks, this is definitely a solution but I am avoiding having to go through the if-else ladder to find out the object's actual type. I feel it kind of negates whole point of polymorphism, no? –  Rishi Nov 30 '11 at 21:05
void Draw(Box b) {}

is wrong way of Drawing on Box class. Box class should just have Draw() method.

if you want to use List of type shape for drawing purpose then you must make sure that you have Draw method overriden in derived classes.

the answer that you marked as accepted says it in details.

Also for info , Draw (Box b) suits in Static method category.

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