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Back in the good-old days of floppy, if you enable write protection of a floppy, DOS would kindly tell you that you cannot write to it. Now we have SD card that can hold the content of thousands of floppy and we still have the write protection - and it's handy sometime. But nobody is able to tell me I can't write to it, at least on Linux. I have a lovely script that partition and format a SD card in a way I like. It took me 1/2 hour of debugging just to find out that the SD card is write-protected.

So the question, is there a way that the software can detect such condition?

Thanks,

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1 Answer 1

You probably just need to check the return value of whatever program you're using (meaning your script should check the return value of everything it executes, and print a warning message or bail out as appropriate when it sees an unexpected result). Here, I mounted an SD card with its write-protect switch enabled to /media/system, and tried writing to it with different commands:

$ cd /media/system
$ touch nonce
touch: cannot touch `nonce': Read-only file system
$ echo $?
1
$ echo hi > nonce
bash: nonce: Read-only file system
$ echo $?
1
$ cp ~/.bashrc nonce
cp: cannot create regular file `nonce': Read-only file system
$ echo $?
1
$

Now I tried those same commands in my home directory:

$ cd
$ touch nonce
$ echo $?
0
$ echo hi > nonce
$ echo $?
0
$ cp .bashrc nonce
$ echo $?
0
$ 

It's also worth pointing out that write protection on an SD card is enforced by the reading device, not anything inside the card itself: which means that the reading device can choose to ignore that switch.

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