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How do I copy children using XSL?

Source:

<body>
   <keyword><i color="blue">super</i>man</keyword>
   <keyword><i color="blue">super</i>man</keyword>
   <keyword><i color="blue">super</i>woman</keyword>
</body>

I am using the following

  <xsl:template match="keyword" >
    <keyword>
      <xsl:attribute name="type">Key Words Head First</xsl:attribute>

      <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
      </xsl:copy>
    </keyword>

  </xsl:template>

When using the above code I am getting double nested <keyword> tags.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
What does the source xml look like? – Paul Butcher Nov 30 '11 at 21:11
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to output a keyword explicitly and copy the existing keyword using xsl:copy. As an alternative to @DevNull's answer:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="keyword">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:attribute name="type">Key Words Head First</xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

...produces the following, when applied to your input:

<body>
    <keyword type="Key Words Head First"><i color="blue">super</i>man</keyword>
    <keyword type="Key Words Head First"><i color="blue">super</i>man</keyword>
    <keyword type="Key Words Head First"><i color="blue">super</i>woman</keyword>
</body>

From the comments:

...what if the attribute needs to be overridden. Like suppose 'keyword' already has a 'type' attribute.

In that case, don't copy the existing type attribute:

<xsl:template match="keyword">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:attribute name="type">Key Words Head First</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="@*[not(name()='type')]|node()"/>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I don't show this in the example, but what if the attribute needs to be overridden. Like suppose 'keyword' already has a 'type' attribute. I tested your code and it does not overwrite it. – joe Nov 30 '11 at 21:47
    
+1 for doing it like I would do it. This is more helpful to the OP than my answer. – Daniel Haley Nov 30 '11 at 21:48
    
@joe - see my updated answer for ignoring existing @type. You could also use the same predicate in @lwburk's answer. – Daniel Haley Nov 30 '11 at 21:54
    
@DevNull - See my edit for an answer. – Wayne Burkett Nov 30 '11 at 21:56

xsl:copy is copying the context item, which in this case is keyword. Basically you're wrapping the existing keyword with a new one.

Try removing the xsl:copy:

  <xsl:template match="keyword" >
    <keyword type="Key Words Head First">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*[name() != 'type']"/>
    </keyword>    
  </xsl:template>

Note: Your final output will depend on whether you have other templates to handle the children of keyword (like an identity transform).

You can find more information on copying and the identity transform here: http://www.w3.org/TR/xslt#copying

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Perfectly good answer. Arguably better, since it's one line fewer. I only provided mine to show that it can be done both ways. – Wayne Burkett Nov 30 '11 at 22:03
    
+1 for a correct answer. – Dimitre Novatchev Dec 1 '11 at 3:53

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