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I am new to C. I am experienced in GWBASIC. In an effort to learn, I am attempting to write a program that will convert the individual chars in a string to a numerical value as so:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
a b c d e f g h i
j k l m n o p q r
s t u v w x y z

For example, user input for string A could be 'dog', said program would then store [d][o][g] as [4][6][7] in string B. The below code works for a string w/up to four chars, but there must be a more efficient way of doing this.

int main()
{
    char a[0];
    char b[0];
    scanf("%s",a);
    if (a[0] == 'a' || a[0] == 'j' || a[0] == 's') b[0] = '1';
    if (a[0] == 'b' || a[0] == 'k' || a[0] == 't') b[0] = '2';
    if (a[0] == 'c' || a[0] == 'l' || a[0] == 'u') b[0] = '3';
    if (a[0] == 'd' || a[0] == 'm' || a[0] == 'v') b[0] = '4';
    if (a[0] == 'e' || a[0] == 'n' || a[0] == 'w') b[0] = '5';
    if (a[0] == 'f' || a[0] == 'o' || a[0] == 'x') b[0] = '6';
    if (a[0] == 'g' || a[0] == 'p' || a[0] == 'y') b[0] = '7';
    if (a[0] == 'h' || a[0] == 'q' || a[0] == 'z') b[0] = '8';
    if (a[0] == 'i' || a[0] == 'r') b[0] = '9';
    if (a[1] == 'a' || a[1] == 'j' || a[1] == 's') b[1] = '1'; 
    if (a[1] == 'b' || a[1] == 'k' || a[1] == 't') b[1] = '2';
    if (a[1] == 'c' || a[1] == 'l' || a[1] == 'u') b[1] = '3';
    if (a[1] == 'd' || a[1] == 'm' || a[1] == 'v') b[1] = '4';
    if (a[1] == 'e' || a[1] == 'n' || a[1] == 'w') b[1] = '5';
    if (a[1] == 'f' || a[1] == 'o' || a[1] == 'x') b[1] = '6';
    if (a[1] == 'g' || a[1] == 'p' || a[1] == 'y') b[1] = '7';
    if (a[1] == 'h' || a[1] == 'q' || a[1] == 'z') b[1] = '8';
    if (a[1] == 'i' || a[1] == 'r') b[1] = '9';
    if (a[2] == 'a' || a[2] == 'j' || a[2] == 's') b[2] = '1';
    if (a[2] == 'b' || a[2] == 'k' || a[2] == 't') b[2] = '2';
    if (a[2] == 'c' || a[2] == 'l' || a[2] == 'u') b[2] = '3';
    if (a[2] == 'd' || a[2] == 'm' || a[2] == 'v') b[2] = '4';
    if (a[2] == 'e' || a[2] == 'n' || a[2] == 'w') b[2] = '5';
    if (a[2] == 'f' || a[2] == 'o' || a[2] == 'x') b[2] = '6';
    if (a[2] == 'g' || a[2] == 'p' || a[2] == 'y') b[2] = '7';
    if (a[2] == 'h' || a[2] == 'q' || a[2] == 'z') b[2] = '8';
    if (a[2] == 'i' || a[2] == 'r') b[2] = '9';
    if (a[3] == 'a' || a[3] == 'j' || a[3] == 's') b[3] = '1';
    if (a[3] == 'b' || a[3] == 'k' || a[3] == 't') b[3] = '2';
    if (a[3] == 'c' || a[3] == 'l' || a[3] == 'u') b[3] = '3';
    if (a[3] == 'd' || a[3] == 'm' || a[3] == 'v') b[3] = '4';
    if (a[3] == 'e' || a[3] == 'n' || a[3] == 'w') b[3] = '5';
    if (a[3] == 'f' || a[3] == 'o' || a[3] == 'x') b[3] = '6';
    if (a[3] == 'g' || a[3] == 'p' || a[3] == 'y') b[3] = '7';
    if (a[3] == 'h' || a[3] == 'q' || a[3] == 'z') b[3] = '8';
    if (a[3] == 'i' || a[3] == 'r') b[3] = '9';
    printf("%s\n",b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
'd' - 'a' is equal to 3. –  David Heffernan Nov 30 '11 at 21:17
    
note that in C the '=' operator is assignment, to check equality use the == operator. You could something like if(strA[0] == 'a' || strA[0] == 'j' || strA[0] == 's') strB[0] = 1; ... and so on for the other cases, to check this for every character use a for or while loop and instead of the 0 use an incremented value. –  rankep Nov 30 '11 at 21:20
    
@rankep: I think that salicemspiritus wants strB[0] = '1' rather than strB[0] = 1. –  ruakh Nov 30 '11 at 21:23
    
Also, to check if a value is equal to a character, you have to put the character within apostropges: if (strA[0] == 'a') –  mort Nov 30 '11 at 21:25
    
There's no such thing as an array of 0 length; you need char a[1]. –  Dave Nov 30 '11 at 23:55

6 Answers 6

Assuming that your compiler uses an ASCII encoding then you can use the following simple arithmetic to get your answer:

1 + (strA[i] - 'a') % 9

You really don't want to implement this with a long list of if statements or indeed a switch statement.

Naturally you will have input validation issues if you have non alphabetical characters, numeric characters, upper-case characters and so on. I presume you can simply ignore those for a learning exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
Just a side note: Based on the chart provided, I believe the OP would then have to %9 this value. –  williamg Nov 30 '11 at 21:31
    
@williamg my guess is that chart needs to be corrected!! ;-) –  David Heffernan Nov 30 '11 at 21:35
    
I would have thought so too, but in his comment he used the columns 1-9 regardless of the row. However, I have a bad habit of assuming things... ;-) –  williamg Nov 30 '11 at 21:39
    
@DavidHeffernan: seeing how 'o' gets converted to '6', I think the OP means to use only 1-9. –  ninjalj Nov 30 '11 at 21:44
    
@ninjalj, williamg yeah, you are right –  David Heffernan Nov 30 '11 at 21:50

To correct your original approach, you need to do two things:

  • Use single quotes around character constants;
  • Use == to check for equality;
  • Terminate statements with ;.

... so your snippet becomes:

if (strA[0] == 'a')
    strB[0] = '1';
if (strA[0] == 'b')
    strB[0] = '2';
if (strA[0] == 'c')
    strB[0] = '3';
share|improve this answer
    
Correct. I have since learned this, thank you. –  salicemspiritus Nov 30 '11 at 23:16

You can type the following exactly into a gwbasic editor and it will solve your problem

10 INPUT A$

12 L = LEN(A$)

15 FOR T = 1 TO L

20 M$ = MID$(A$,T,1)

25 GOSUB 70

30 B$ = B$ + V$

35 NEXT T

40 PRINT B$

50 END

55 REM -----------------

70 REM - Subroutine to convert m$ into v$

72 X = ASC(M$) : REM this is the ascii value of m$ (eg. "a" = 97)

74 X = X - 96 : REM so that 97 becomes "1"

80 IF X > 9 THEN X = X - 9 : GOTO 80

90 V$ = STR$(X) : REM just converting to a string type variable

95 RETURN : REM takes you back to line 30 where this value is added to the

96 REM final resulting B$ - when I say added I mean a char added to a string

97 REM such that   "APPL" + "E" = "APPLE"

98 REM ------------------------------------------ DONE
share|improve this answer

For ASCII, it would go somewhat like:

... make sure strB has enough space ...
for (i = 0; i < ... length of strA ... ; i++) {
    /* you should always check your input is valid */
    if (strA[i] >= 'a' && strB[i] <= 'z')
        strB[i] = (strA[i] - 'a') % 9 + 1;
    else
        strB[i] = ... some default value ...
}

For EBCDIC:

for (i = 0; i < ... length of strA ... ; i++) {
    /* you should always check your input is valid */
    if (strA[i] >= 'a' && strB[i] <= 'r')
        strB[i] = strA[i] & 0xF;
    else if (strA[i] >= 's' && strB <= 'z')
        strB[i] = (strA[i] & 0xF) - 1;
    else
        strB[i] = ... some default value ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice work with EBDIC!! –  David Heffernan Nov 30 '11 at 22:18
1  
@DavidHeffernan: heh, nice and EBCDIC in the same sentence, who would have thought? –  ninjalj Nov 30 '11 at 22:35
    
Do I need to define i? I get an error if I do not. –  salicemspiritus Nov 30 '11 at 23:54
    
@salice yes you do. But that's very basic C and unrelated to the question you asked. –  David Heffernan Dec 1 '11 at 7:53
    
@David Thank you for all your help. I am still unable to apply what you have said. I apologize for being a novice, I am doing my best to learn. –  salicemspiritus Dec 1 '11 at 16:23

Have a closer look at an ASCII table. You'll see that all letters are encoded with some integer value. As a start, if you only have lower case letters, it's enough to substract the character code of 'a' from any letter to get what you want

int nr = strA[0] - 'a' + 1;
//now you'd need to convert back to a string; better: strB should be an array of integer

Also, = is the assignment operator; you need to use == to check for equality.

share|improve this answer

try this :)

int strB[MAX_LEN] = {0};
char *strA = malloc (MAX_LEN * sizeof(char));
int i,c = 0,x;

scanf("%s",strA);

for(i = 0 ; i<strlen(strA) ; i++){
    x = strA[i] - 'a' + 1;
    if(x >= 1 && x <= 9)
        strB[c] = x;
    else if(x <= 18){
        strB[c] = x - 10;
    else if(x <= 26){
        strB[c] = x - 19;
    if(x <= 26)
        c++;
}

or you can use ninjalj approach in the for loop, if you aleady checked the input:

for(i=0 ; i<strlen(strA) ; i++){
    strB[i] = (strA[i] - 'a') % 9 + 1;
}

or this :

for(i=0 ; i<strlen(strA) ; i++){
    if(strA[i] >= 'a' && strA[i] <= 'z'){
        strB[c] = (strA[i] - 'a') % 9 + 1;
        c++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
why are you dynamically allocating strA, if strB is statically allocated? –  Dave Nov 30 '11 at 23:58

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