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Task: To create database of workers. The program also should to ouput worker's info by name and count average salary of all workers. When I try to compile this code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct worker {
    char name[10];
    int salary;
};
int main (void);
    struct worker p1 = {"koko", 3400};
    printf ("name=%s,salary=%d,p1,name,p1,salary");
    return(0);
}

I get

./dz2.c:11:9: error: expected declaration specifiers or «...» before string constant
./dz2.c:12:1: error: expected identifier or «(» before «return»
./dz2.c:13:1: error: expected identifier or «(» before «}» token

I would be grateful for solution of this problem.

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2  
formatting code is good. Code is not just for computers to read –  sehe Nov 30 '11 at 21:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Combining the hints by others:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct worker {
    char name[10];
    int salary;
};

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    struct worker p1 = {"koko", 3400};
    printf ("name=%s,salary=%d\n",p1.name,p1.salary);
    return 0;
}

Note how

  • p1.name and p1.salary reference the fields inside p1 (of type worker)
  • the declaration of main was fixed
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Remove the ; from the end of the following line int main(void); and insert a { instead.

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Change int main (void); to:

int main (void) {

You use int main (void); to declare the prototype, but must open the parentheses to start the actual contents of the function.

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You are doing a lot of things wrong.

Since this is homework and you are supposed to learn things, try these things:

  • Start with a program that is just the skeleton of include files and an empty main function. Doing this will show you that you wrote your int main(void); wrong. It should be int main() {.
  • Start with a printf function call that outputs just a number that you type in. This should show you that you did the printf arguments wrong. Why did you think the variables should be inside the string double-quotes? And once you do have the arguments in the correct place, why do you think a printf with two conversions (the %s and %d) will work with four arguments?

In summary: when you get syntax errors with new code, back up and undo your changes until you have code that does compile. Then write small new pieces of code so that you can see exactly where you went wrong.

Also I recommend compiling with the maximum level of warning options. That would have told you the printf statement is wrong. I believe this is the default for Microsoft Visual Studio in debug mode. For GCC on Linux or BSD you add -Wall -W to your gcc command.

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You have a syntax error in defining main(). It needs an opening curly brace, not a semicolon.

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Please forgive me if I'm wrong, but looks like a buggy source you'd usually get in an exam. The misplaced semicolon is not the only error in the program.

Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

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