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I have seen similar questions(but in C) -- Calculating Fibonacci Numbers Recursively in C about my issue.

I am a bit stuck on how to keep on printing fibonacci numbers until it reaches about 40,000, in C# in my console application, How can I achieve this?

E.G, I want the application to do this:

0
1
1
2
3
5
8

and so on.

Thanks. I'd hate to say this, but I had a brainwave, and solved it!

Here is what I did:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int num1 = 0;
    int num2 = 1;
    int sum = 1;
    while (num1 <= 15000)
    {
        sum = num1 + num2;
        num1 = num2;
        num2 = sum;
       Console.WriteLine(num2);
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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closed as not constructive by Ryan, Austin Salonen, Amy, sehe, ho1 Dec 1 '11 at 8:38

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
Eventually you'd run out of stack space if you were to do this recursively, which will happen well before forever ends. –  Mark Elliot Nov 30 '11 at 21:45
6  
If it's recursively, you'll end up with a stack overflow sooner or later. –  Nasreddine Nov 30 '11 at 21:45
3  
What have you done so far? What specifically are you having troubles with? Show us your code. Oftentimes people want others to do their homework for them so you need to show us you are trying before people will help. –  Matt Cofer Nov 30 '11 at 21:45
1  
@MattCofer I'm not doing homework. –  H Bellamy Nov 30 '11 at 21:50
1  
It sure would be nice if C# could do tail recursion... –  mydogisbox Nov 30 '11 at 21:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about something that has a loop in it? Like:

    static void main() 
    {
        int num1 = 0;
        int num2 = 1;
        int sum = 1;
        Console.WriteLine(num1);
        while (sum < 40000)
        {
           sum = num1 + num2;
           num1 = num2;
           num2 = sum;    
           Console.WriteLine(num2);
        }
    }   
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You can also do this with a for loop with multiple variables: for(int first=0,second=1,current=0;first<100;current=first+second,first=second,second=cu‌​rrent) { Console.WriteLine(first); } –  What Would Be Cool Feb 9 '13 at 22:28

Just for fun, thought I'd throw in a fun way to do this with LINQ extension methods and a generator (infinite sequence):

// A utility class that holds math utility functions.
public static class MathUtility
{
    // This method returns the fibonacci sequence which is an 
    // infinite sequence of numbers where each result is the
    // sum of the previous two results.
    public static IEnumerable<int> GetFibonacciSequence()
    {
        int first = 0;
        int second = 1;

        // first and second result are always 1.
        yield return first;
        yield return second;

        // this enumerable sequence is bounded by the caller.
        while(true)
        {
            int current = first + second;
            yield return current;

            // wind up for next number if we're requesting one
            first = second;
            second = current;
        }
    }
}

This generates an infinite (theoretically) sequence (it will eventually overflow if you let it go past range of int).

You can then call:

foreach(var num in MathUtility.GetFibonacciSequence().TakeWhile(num => num <= 40000))
{
    Console.WriteLine(num);
}

In this way, you have your presentation (the output) separate from the data generation.

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You can't do that recursively - remember, that each method call uses you stack. Google about, huh, stack overflow :)

You'll need to find iterating version of the algorithm, it's everywhere on the internet. And, of course, while fib numbers are quite quickly running up, it's impossible to output them forever.

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1  
I doubt you'd hit a stack overflow with a 40k limit on the size of the number. I wouldn't even be surprised if you'd hit the maximal value double can represent before running out of stack. Using BigInteger you probably can get a stack overflow, but it will be far beyond the OP's limit. And some versions of the .net jitter support tail call recursion which(assuming a recursive implementation that allows tail call recursion) makes this O(1) in stack space. –  CodesInChaos Nov 30 '11 at 22:21
    
Oh, I didn't know about tail call recursion in .net, interesting! –  Piotr Zierhoffer Nov 30 '11 at 22:27
    
Since this form of tail recursion isn't guaranteed to occur, you can't rely on it, and thus it's mostly useless. So for reliable tail calls you need to use the tailcall IL instruction, but the C# compiler doesn't do that. –  CodesInChaos Dec 1 '11 at 13:35

C# doesn't easily support tail recursion so doing a simple recursion algorithm will cause a stack overflow with large enough numbers. For this problem it would be simplest to use a loop instead of recursion. If you're really stuck on recursion, here is a blog post that investigates both faking recursion and converting C# generated IL code to use tail recursion.

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There are 2 major mistakes in your program:

  1. Multiple use of main()
  2. fibonacci_recursive is not created, though it is declared at the start of program.
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static int Fibonacci(int n)
{
    if(n <= 1) return n;
    else return Fibonacci(n - 1) + Fibonacci(n - 2);
}


static void PrintAllFibonacci()
{
    int n = 0;
    while(true)
        Console.WriteLine(Fibonacci(n++));
}

EDIT:

a different approach using a stack

static ulong Fibonacci(int n, IList<ulong> stack)
{
    ulong fibonacci;

    if (n <= 1)
    {
        fibonacci = (ulong)n;
    }
    else
    {
        ulong n1, n2;
        if (n < stack.Count)
            n1 = stack[n - 1];
        else
            n1 = Fibonacci(n - 1, stack);
        if (n - 1 < stack.Count)
            n2 = stack[n - 2];
        else
            n2 = Fibonacci(n - 2, stack);

        fibonacci = n1 + n2;
    }

    if (n >= stack.Count)
        stack.Add(fibonacci);

    return fibonacci;
}


static void PrintAllFibonacci()
{
    var stack = new List<ulong>();
    var n = 0;
    while(n < 50)
        Console.WriteLine(n + ") " + Fibonacci(n++, stack));
}
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Your Fibonacci(n) has exponential runtime in n. Luckily the value of fibonacci numbers also grows exponentially, so the 40k limit is still reached quickly. –  CodesInChaos Nov 30 '11 at 22:01
    
I wrote that before @HBellamy editet his question! –  esskar Nov 30 '11 at 22:03
    
It's possible to write a fast recursive version of a Fibonacci number generator. Either by memoization, or by using more parameters. –  CodesInChaos Nov 30 '11 at 22:13
    
@CodeInChaos added another approach using a stack! –  esskar Nov 30 '11 at 23:00

Use the Closed form solution

    public static long ClosedFormFibonacci(int i)
    {
        const double phi = 1.61803398874989; // or use your own or calculate it
        const double sqrt5 = 2.23606798; // same as above
        return (long)Math.Round(Math.Pow(phi, i) / sqrt5);
    }

It looks like it overflows a long at about the 92nd Fibonacci number

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