Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working with an MSSQL table that does not have a primary or unique key contstraint defined. There are two fields, lets call them xId and yId, that I believe together would be a composite key, but I want to confirm this by examining the data.

I'm thinking that I should be able to write a SQL count statement that I can compare to the total number of records on the table that would logically determine if the combination of xId and yId (or a third column id necessary) could in fact act as a composite key. However, I'm having trouble coming up with the right GROUP BY or other type of clause that would confirm or disprove this.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use group by and having:

select xid,yid
from table
group by xid,yid
having count(1) > 1

This will show any pairs that are non-unique, so if there are no rows returned its a good key.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this soultion. Now I can examine the non-unique pairs to determine what I need to add to the key to make it unique. Thanks! –  Paul Nov 30 '11 at 22:19

Just do a count of the total rows of the table, and then do

select count(1)
from(
    select xid,yid
    from table
    group by xid,yid
)a;

if all pairs of xid and yid form a unique identifier, then the two numbers will be the same.

Alternatively, you could count the number of distinct pairs of xid and yid and find the largest such number:

select max(num_rows)
from(
    select xid,yid,count(1) as num_rows
    from table
    group by xid,yid
)a;

The result of this query is 1 if and only if (xid,yid) pairs form a unique identifier for your table.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was looking for. I was so close! Thanks! –  Paul Nov 30 '11 at 22:16
    
@Paul - You're welcome. –  Jack Maney Nov 30 '11 at 22:17

this will list all the problem combinations (if any) of xid,yid:

SELECT
    COUNT(*),xid,yid
    FROM YourTable
    GROUP BY xid,yid
    HAVING COUNT(*)>1
share|improve this answer
    
As a general point of order, count(1) is preferable than count(*). Count omits rows where the named contents are null, so if you have rows where all cells are null, they get omitted. I believe you also get a minor performance improvement by using Count(1) –  Jon Egerton Nov 30 '11 at 22:19
1  
@jon, COUNT( * ) does not omit rows where every value is null. Results and performance should be just the same with COUNT(1) or COUNT( * ). Also if the columns in question permit nulls then they can't be part of a key. –  sqlvogel Dec 1 '11 at 9:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.