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This came up while answering BufferedWriter only works the first time

As far as I understand the Java Doc (and this is confirmed by many posts on the net) a DatagramPacket should not accept more data than it's current size. The documentation for DatagramSocket.receive says

This method blocks until a datagram is received. The length field of the datagram packet object contains the length of the received message. If the message is longer than the packet's length, the message is truncated.

So, I made a program which reuses the receiving packet and send it longer and longer messages.

public class ReusePacket {

    private static class Sender implements Runnable {

        public void run() {
            try {
                DatagramSocket clientSocket = new DatagramSocket();
                byte[] buffer = "1234567890abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz".getBytes("US-ASCII");
                InetAddress address = InetAddress.getByName("127.0.0.1");

                for (int i = 1; i < buffer.length; i++) {
                    DatagramPacket mypacket = new DatagramPacket(buffer, i, address, 40000);
                    clientSocket.send(mypacket);
                    Thread.sleep(200);
                }                  
                System.exit(0);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {
        DatagramSocket serverSock = new DatagramSocket(40000);
        byte[] buffer = new byte[100];
        DatagramPacket recievedPacket = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length);

        new Thread(new Sender()).start();

        while (true) {
            serverSock.receive(recievedPacket);
            String byteToString = new String(recievedPacket.getData(), 0, recievedPacket.getLength(), "US-ASCII");
            System.err.println("Length " + recievedPacket.getLength() + " data " + byteToString);
        }
    }
}

The output is

Length 1 data 1
Length 2 data 12
Length 3 data 123
Length 4 data 1234
Length 5 data 12345
Length 6 data 123456
...

So, even if the length is 1, in for the next receive it gets a message with length 2 and will not truncate it. However, if I manually set the length of the package then the message will be truncated to this length.

I have tested this on OSX 10.7.2 (Java 1.6.0_29) and Solaris 10 (Java 1.6.0_21). So to my questions.

Why does my code work and can expect it to work on other systems also?

To clarify, the behavior seems to have changed sometime in the past (at least for some JVMs), but I don't know if the old behavior was a bug. Am I lucky it works this way and should I expect it to work the same way on Oracle JVM, IBM JVM, JRockit, Android, AIX etc?

After further investigation and checking the source for 1.3.0, 1.3.1 and 1.4.0 the change was introduces in Sun implementation from 1.4.0, however, there is no mention of this in either the release notes or the network specific release notes of JDK 1.4.0.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two different lengths here. The length of the packet is set to 100 in the constructor:

DatagramPacket recievedPacket = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length);

According to the docs, the length() method tells you the length of the message currently stored in the packet, which it does. Changing

byte[] buffer = new byte[100];

to

byte[] buffer = new byte[10];

yeilds the following output:

Length 1 data 1
Length 2 data 12
...
Length 9 data 123456789
Length 10 data 1234567890
Length 10 data 1234567890
Length 10 data 1234567890
...
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that, but considering if you wanted to put data into the packet yourself, you could not use the setLength method, but instead know that there is packet protected bufLength that is not documenter that you should use. Also, this means that almost all examples on the net such as mindprod.com/jgloss/udp.html and coderanch.com/t/206099/sockets/java/… are wrong. – Roger Lindsjö Nov 30 '11 at 23:01
    
They are easily shown as wrong in both your example and mine as soon as the second packet comes through larger than the first. For the second one, the post is from 2004 on jre 1.3.1, while both of our examples were on 1.6.*. It is quite possible that the issue in those examples was considered undesirable and fixed somewhere along the way. – Thomas Dec 1 '11 at 0:59
    
Agree that the old comments are wrong, but am still curious of what the right approach is should I write for previous JVM, for other platforms such as Adroid, AIX etc. The behavior seems to have changed but I didn't find a bug report or not about it. Will update the question. – Roger Lindsjö Dec 1 '11 at 7:54
    
After further investigation and checking the source for 1.3.0, 1.3.1 and 1.4.0 the change was introduces in Sun implementation from 1.4.0, however, there is no mention of this in either the release notes or the network specific release notes of JDK 1.4.0. – Roger Lindsjö Dec 3 '11 at 10:57
    
I guess as for now, the best answer is that it did change at least for Sun JDK 1.4.0 and this could or could not work on other implementations, YMMV ;-) – Roger Lindsjö Dec 3 '11 at 10:58

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