Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use lubridate and figured that this would be so easy

ymd("2010-01-31")+months(0:23)

But look what one gets. It is all messed up!

 [1] "2010-01-31 UTC" "2010-03-03 UTC" "2010-03-31 UTC" "2010-05-01 UTC" "2010-05-31 UTC" "2010-07-01 UTC" "2010-07-31 UTC" "2010-08-31 UTC" "2010-10-01 UTC"
[10] "2010-10-31 UTC" "2010-12-01 UTC" "2010-12-31 UTC" "2011-01-31 UTC" "2011-03-03 UTC" "2011-03-31 UTC" "2011-05-01 UTC" "2011-05-31 UTC" "2011-07-01 UTC"
[19] "2011-07-31 UTC" "2011-08-31 UTC" "2011-10-01 UTC" "2011-10-31 UTC" "2011-12-01 UTC" "2011-12-31 UTC"

Then I read how lubridate caters to phenomenon such as interval, duration and period. So, OK I realize that a month is actually the number of days defined by (365*4+1)/48 = 30.438 days. So I tried to get smart and rewrite it as

ymd("2010-01-31")+ as.period(months(0:23))

But that just gave an error.

Error in as.period.default(months(0:23)) : 
  (list) object cannot be coerced to type 'double'
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Yes, you found the correct trick: going back a day from the first of the next month.

Here is as a one-liner in base R:

R> seq(as.Date("2010-02-01"), length=24, by="1 month") - 1
 [1] "2010-01-31" "2010-02-28" "2010-03-31" "2010-04-30" "2010-05-31"
 [6] "2010-06-30" "2010-07-31" "2010-08-31" "2010-09-30" "2010-10-31"
[11] "2010-11-30" "2010-12-31" "2011-01-31" "2011-02-28" "2011-03-31"
[16] "2011-04-30" "2011-05-31" "2011-06-30" "2011-07-31" "2011-08-31"
[21] "2011-09-30" "2011-10-31" "2011-11-30" "2011-12-31"
R> 

So no need for lubridate which (while being a fine package) isn't needed for simple task like this. Plus, its overloading of existing base functions still strikes me as somewhat dangerous...

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 because that's killer! Never used seq for class Date before. –  Rappster Jul 2 '12 at 21:24

It is amazing how typing out a question focuses creative energy. I think I worked out the answer. I may as well post it here for the next poor soul who finds themselves wasting time.

ymd("2010-02-01")+ months(0:23)-days(1)

Simply specify the first day of the next month and generate a sequence from that but subtract 1 days from it to get the last day of the preceding month.

[1] "2010-01-31 UTC" "2010-02-28 UTC" "2010-03-31 UTC" "2010-04-30 UTC" "2010-05-31 UTC" "2010-06-30 UTC" "2010-07-31 UTC" "2010-08-31 UTC" "2010-09-30 UTC"
[10] "2010-10-31 UTC" "2010-11-30 UTC" "2010-12-31 UTC" "2011-01-31 UTC" "2011-02-28 UTC" "2011-03-31 UTC" "2011-04-30 UTC" "2011-05-31 UTC" "2011-06-30 UTC"
[19] "2011-07-31 UTC" "2011-08-31 UTC" "2011-09-30 UTC" "2011-10-31 UTC" "2011-11-30 UTC" "2011-12-31 UTC"

By the way, how do I get rid of the pesky "UTC" designations. Time zones are a life saver when they are needed. The rest of the time they are a nuisance.

share|improve this answer
2  
use strftime(date) to get rid of the timezone. so strftime('2010-10-31 UTC') would give you 2010-10-31. –  Ramnath Nov 30 '11 at 22:35
    
Can you accept your answer as well for the next poor soul? –  Sacha Epskamp Nov 30 '11 at 22:59
    
@SachaEpskamp: Stackoverflow will only allow me to accept my answer after two days. I guess that is quite clever. There may be another workaround that is more elegant. –  Farrel Nov 30 '11 at 23:22
    
@Ramnath strftime gives me the date of the day before because where I live midnight UTC is actually 19:00 of the day before. I am in the eastern time zone. strftime(ymd("2010-02-01")+ months(0:23)-days(1)) [1] "2010-01-30 19:00:00" "2010-02-27 19:00:00" "2010-03-30 20:00:00" etc. –  Farrel Nov 30 '11 at 23:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.