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How can I have references between two classes in Objective-C?
Objective-C #import loop

I'm getting a couple errors in my code and I'm not sure but I think its because I'm #importing an interface inside another interface where I'm #importing the other interface. If I'm confusing you I'll give you an example.

#import "OneClass.h"

@interface SecondClass : NSObject
{
    OneClass * obj;
}

#import "SecondClass.h"

@interface OneClass : NSObject
{
    SecondClass * obj;
}
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marked as duplicate by e.James, Kevin Ballard, fbrereto, Josh Caswell, Graviton Dec 1 '11 at 10:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What are the errors? –  fbrereto Nov 30 '11 at 23:23
    
Also, is the sample above actually two separate files? As you have it one might interpret the whole block to reside within a single file... if they are separate, what are the names of the files in which the blocks live? –  fbrereto Nov 30 '11 at 23:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you have a circular import. The problem here is that the second import (the one that re-imports your first header) is basically ignored by the compiler, since it thinks it's already imported that header.

The solution here is to use @class forward-declarations instead of using #imports. Not only does this solver the circular import problem, but it's a better idea anyway since it breaks unnecessary dependency chains (e.g. if I edit OneClass.h, SecondClass.h won't need to be re-processed).

To apply this here, simply remove the #import OneClass.h in SecondClass.h and replace it with @class OneClass;

In the more general case, you don't ever need to #import a header file just to declare an ivar/property/method that uses a class from that header. The @class token is sufficient. You do, however, need to #import the header file if you're inheriting from the class, or if you're referencing another non-class type declared in that header. Also remember that if you use @class in your header, you need to remember to put the actual #import into your .m file.

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If you're importing a header file you need to put the full file name. In this case...

#import "SecondClass.h" instead of #import "SecondClass"

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That certainly is a bug with his code as-written, but I suspect what he wrote here is pseudocode and that's not actually the bug with his "real" code (the bug there is a circular dependency). –  Kevin Ballard Nov 30 '11 at 23:26
    
I thought the whole reason we use #import instead of #include is because it is smart enough to handle circular dependencies? –  Mark Adams Nov 30 '11 at 23:31
1  
NO it does not handle circular dependencies, it does handle multiple inclusions, there is no need for the usual C/C++ #ifdef guards. –  Zaph Nov 30 '11 at 23:33
    
I'm not arguing that #importing header files in .h files is sub-optimal. I'm simply trying to understand why #import usually takes precedence over #include. I know that #import guarantees that a header will only be included once. I fail to see how this creates a circular dependancy though. –  Mark Adams Nov 30 '11 at 23:34
    
@MarkAdams: A circular #include will loop forever. An #import is precisely equivalent to an #include with import guards (or with #pragma once), although it's probably more efficient. But it doesn't solve the circular dependency problem. That problem cannot be solved with trickery around includes. The only way to solve it is to avoid the circular include to begin with, typically via forward-declarations, which is what @class is here. –  Kevin Ballard Nov 30 '11 at 23:51

You can declare the use of a class without having to #import its associated header, like so:

// #import "SecondClass.h" // no need for this anymore
@class SecondClass;

@interface OneClass : NSObject
    {
    SecondClass * obj; // OK
    }
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Whenever possible this is the preferred method, that is forward @class declarations i the .h instead of #import. The .m will have to have an #import though. –  Zaph Nov 30 '11 at 23:34

When there are no physical dependencies, you should be using forward declarations to minimise your build times:

// SecondClass.h

@class OneClass;

@interface SecondClass : NSObject
{
    OneClass * obj;
}

@end

// OneClass.h

@class SecondClass;

@interface OneClass : NSObject
{
    SecondClass * obj;
}

@end

It also happens to fix your dependency cycle ;)

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what do you mean by physical dependency? –  Jordan Medlock Dec 4 '11 at 0:30
    
a forward declaration does not have physical dependence, it's really just a name/label -- specifically, the variable to be legally declared in the header without the declaration (@interface) visible prior to its usage. Contrast: both classes have a physical dependence on NSObject (via inheritance) -- if Foundation is not included prior to the class declaration, then it is an error. Of course, you would still need to include OneClass.h into SecondClass.m when using a forward (in the majority of cases). –  justin Dec 4 '11 at 6:20
    
Oh ok I get it thanks! this helped me realize there was a more fundamental flaw that made this hard –  Jordan Medlock Dec 5 '11 at 15:34

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