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Is there a way to validate GUID datatype?

I'm using validation attributes. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee707335%28v=vs.91%29.aspx

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You can use a RegularExpressionAttribute. Here's a sample using the format xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx:

[RegularExpression(Pattern = "[0-9a-fA-F]{8}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}")]

You can also create a custom validation attribute, which is probably a cleaner solution.

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It looks to me like this regex would accept 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000, which I would be wary of, because it is what people would get if they said new Guid() by accident, instead of Guid.NewGuid() – Jordan Morris Mar 11 at 1:11

You could write your own subclass of CustomValidationAttribute that ensures the value is a guid by using the TryParse method of System.Guid (thanks Jon!).

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4  
Or TryParse rather than construct, so it will be control-flow rather than exception handling to catch the failure case. – Jon Hanna Dec 1 '11 at 0:15
    
Agreed. TryParse is the better way to do it. – Sean Reilly Dec 1 '11 at 9:49

This function might help you....

public static bool IsGUID(string expression)
{
    if (expression != null)
    {
        Regex guidRegEx = new Regex(@"^(\{{0,1}([0-9a-fA-F]){8}-([0-9a-fA-F]){4}-([0-9a-fA-F]){4}-([0-9a-fA-F]){4}-([0-9a-fA-F]){12}\}{0,1})$");

        return guidRegEx.IsMatch(expression);
    }
    return false;
}

You may remove the static or put the function in some Utility Class

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It looks to me like this regex would accept 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000, which I would be wary of, because it is what people would get if they said new Guid() by accident, instead of Guid.NewGuid() – Jordan Morris Mar 11 at 1:12

This will use .Net's built-in Guid type for the validation, so you don't have to use a custom regular expression (which hasn't undergone Microsoft's rigorous testing):

public class RequiredGuidAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        var guid = CastToGuidOrDefault(value);

        return !Equals(guid, default(Guid));
    }

    private static Guid CastToGuidOrDefault(object value)
    {
        try
        {
            return (Guid) value;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            if (e is InvalidCastException || e is NullReferenceException) return default(Guid);
            throw;
        }
    }
}

You then just use it like this:

    [RequiredGuid]
    public Guid SomeId { get; set; }

If any of the following are provided to this field, it will end up as a default(Guid), and will be caught by the Validator:

{someId:''}
{someId:'00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000'}
{someId:'XXX5B4C1-17DF-E511-9844-DC4A3E5F7697'}
{someMispelledId:'E735B4C1-17DF-E511-9844-DC4A3E5F7697'}
new Guid()
null //Possible when the Attribute is used on another type
SomeOtherType //Possible when the Attribute is used on another type
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