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I've been playing around with the revealing module patter. I originally started using the Singleton pattern but from reading around the module pattern seems to be the better option.

So i've tested the following:

var test = (function() {

var init = function () {
    alert('hello');
};

return {
    init: init
};
})();

and this works fine when calling

<script>test.init();</script>

However, i want to use jQuery so i tried:

var test = (function($) {

var init = function () {
    $("#samplediv").html('test');
    alert('hello');
};

return {
    init: init
};
})(jQuery);

but this doesn't work. It does work when using:

<script>$(function() { test.init(); });</script>

How can i get it to work without the added jQuery when calling it?

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It works, so you have some other problem I think. –  minitech Dec 1 '11 at 0:00
    
The second case works when using <script>test.init();</script>? –  Michael Willmott Dec 1 '11 at 0:01
    
Yes. It does... –  minitech Dec 1 '11 at 0:02
    
Isn't that pattern producing a singleton too? You just have the one test object... –  nnnnnn Dec 1 '11 at 0:31
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Usually, anything that touches the DOM needs to done in the $(document).ready(fn) callback. $(fn) is a shortcut for this.

So the reason it doesn't work is because you are searching for DOM elements that don't exist yet. So you have 2 choices. Either you must use the $() wrapper, or find another way to run your code only after the DOM elements exist. Another way to do this is to move your script tag the bottom of the body tag so that the DOM elements can exist when it's ran.

<body>
  <!-- your page elements here -->
  <script>test.init();</script>
</body>
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