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CSS specification states that line-height should be applied to text by dividing the specified value by two and applying the result above and below a line of text.

This varies significantly from the traditional understanding of leading, which usually means that spacing is 'added' only above the line of text. (I know this is not 100% correct, because actually line-height doesn't add space, but sets the height of the line; however, this way it's simpler to describe the problem).

Consider this example markup:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>

    <style type="text/css">
    p
        {
        margin:0;
        font-size: 13pt;
        line-height: 15pt;
        }
    h1
        {
        margin:0;
        font-size: 21pt;
        line-height: 30pt;
        }
    </style>

    </head>
    <body>

    <h1>Title</h1>
    <p>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s.</p>
    <p>Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).</p>
    <p>It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.</p>
    </body>
</html>

If line-height was equal to traditional understanding of leading, then the distance between <h1> and first <p> would be equal to the distance between <p>'s, because this distance is defined by the leading. However, this is not the case.

While distance between <p>s remains consistent (p's line-height - p's font-size = 15 - 13 = 2pt), distance between <h1> and the first <p> is different: it is equal to (p's line-height - p's font-size)/2 + (h1's line-height - h1's font-size)/2 = (15 - 13)/2 + (30-21)/2 = 5.5pt.

This can be easily noticed by naked eye if the above markup is processed with a browser.

The problem is that traditional way of maintaining vertical visual rhythm on a page is by setting leading of elements in multiples of base leading. This method is inapplicable in CSS, as shown above.

I have 3 questions:

  1. Is my understanding of line-height, leading and their differences correct?
  2. Is there a way to maintain vertical rhythm with CSS (by mimicing traditional leading with CSS or not)?
  3. (Bonus question) What was the reasoning behind making line-height so different from leading?

UPDATE: thank you so much for your input! Please note that I suggested my own solution and I'd be very grateful for any comments on it: http://stackoverflow.com/a/8335230/710356

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

  1. Yes
  2. Yes. It is not very simple, but using position:relative;, you can get things to line up correctly, for example:

     h2 {
       font-size: 36px;
       line-height: 48px;
       position: relative;
       top: 6px;
     }
    

    Here is a work-in-progress demo

  3. The people who designed CSS are not typographers. It was probably not intentional.

  4. Bonus answer: Here is a talk by Jonathan Hoefler about the problems with designing type for the web and the limits of CSS.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! However, it seems that the demo you linked to is an empty gif file. Also, I don't see any negative values in your code. –  exizt Dec 1 '11 at 0:19
    
Sorry, I fixed the link and remembered that I didn't use negative values. :-) –  bookcasey Dec 1 '11 at 0:20
    
You don't need to use positioning to maintain vertical rhythm at all actually. It can be done by ensuring a consistent line-height (relative to the font-size) and bottom margin. –  joshnh Dec 1 '11 at 0:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alright, this seems to work better than my other solution. It still employs additional <span>s inside block elements. The trick is to set the block element's line-height to 1, and adjust the span's line-height, while also cancelling it out with top and bottom margins. Note that this requires display to be set to inline-block.

However, actually setting margins (so as to make a line-high break between <h1> and <p>) becomes quite difficult and requires some math. So, I guess, trying to use traditional typographic approach to leading is far too time consuming in CSS to be actually employed in developer's work.

Anyway, here's the final code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>

        <style type="text/css">

        span.p
            {
            display:inline-block;
            line-height: 32px;
            }

        span.h
            {
            display:inline-block;
            line-height: 64px;
            margin-top: -32px;
            margin-bottom: -32px;
            }

        p
            {
            margin:0;
            font-size: 26px;
            line-height: 1;
            }
        h1
            {
            margin:0;
            font-size: 42px; 
            line-height: 1;
            }
        </style>

    </head>
    <body>

    <h1><span class="h">Molloy</span></h1>
    <p><span class="p">Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s.</span></p>
    <p><span class="p">Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).</span></p>
    <h1><span class="h">Lorem Ipsum is simply</span></h1>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

I'm adding my own answer, but I'm not marking it as an 'accepted', because I just came up with this method and haven't really checked it thoroughly enough. It's also quite messy in terms of markup readability.

The trick is to wrap every element to which we want to apply our heading in <span> tag, and set the <span>'s CSS properties vertical-align to either middle or sub (they produce slightly different results, and I'm not sure either why or how exactly they are different) and line-height to 0. The result is very close to what is needed, so the distance between <h1> and <p> in the above example becomes almost right (not quite, apparently), i.e. equal to <p>'s line-height. I'm not really good with CSS, so I'm not sure how this might affect overall layout, whether it's acceptible to use such hacks and if this would be cross-browser-friendly. I'd be grateful if you commented on my solution.

Example markup:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>

        <style type="text/css">

        span.lh
            {
            vertical-align: sub;
            line-height:0
            }
        p
            {
            margin:0;
            font-size: 26px;
            line-height: 30px;
            }
        h1
            {
            margin:0;
            font-size: 42px; 
            line-height: 60px;
            }
        </style>

    </head>
    <body>

    <h1><span class="lh">Title</span></h1>
    <p><span class="lh">Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s.</span></p>
    <p><span class="lh">Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).</span></p>
    <h1><span class="lh">Lorem Ipsum is simply</span></h1>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
The downside of this is maintainability and semantics. Wouldn't it be nice if CSS offered us some more options! –  joshnh Dec 1 '11 at 1:56
    
Try SASS or Compass –  Kabir Sarin Mar 21 '14 at 16:09

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