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Suppose I have two different functions(C), the only difference between them is that some of their arguments are of different datatypes(I'm thinking about CBLAS right now). For example:

void cblas_dgemm(const enum CBLAS_ORDER Order, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransA,
             const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransB, const int M, const int N,
             const int K, const double alpha, const double *A,
             const int lda, const double *B, const int ldb,
             const double beta, double *C, const int ldc);


void cblas_sgemm(const enum CBLAS_ORDER Order, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransA,
             const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransB, const int M, const int N,
             const int K, const float alpha, const float *A,
             const int lda, const float *B, const int ldb,
             const float beta, float *C, const int ldc);

Instead of having this function defined twice, just with some datatypes different, Is there a smarter way to have these two functions? like a compiler directive or something?

EDIT(Not sure if this question is allowed by stackoverflow): I'm thinking about how these functions look after being compiled.Am I right in thinking this? "Since single precision addition and double precision addition are different instructions in the hardware level, even if the C compiler was modified to allow the kind of functions the question talks about, the final binaries would be similar because we would need to have two different functions in the binary too?"

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3  
Maybe you want to switch to C++, and enjoy overloading... (meaning you can't do this with pure C) –  Macmade Dec 1 '11 at 0:16
1  
in C++ they can coexist with no problems. –  karlphillip Dec 1 '11 at 0:16
    
c++ - function overloading - THIS WAY! :) –  ScarletAmaranth Dec 1 '11 at 0:19
    
I don't think he meant what Macmade and Karlphillip understood, he knows about overloading and doesn't want to do it, he wants to write code only ones, perhaps you should go to C++ and use template functions :) –  Tamer Shlash Dec 1 '11 at 0:20
    
@Macmade: Your edit substantially changed the question (by giving both functions identical names, while the originals differed), so I rolled it back. –  Jim Lewis Dec 1 '11 at 0:20

3 Answers 3

No, that is not possible. In C, every function name corresponds to one globally unique function. This is why C libraries, including the standard library, are full of function variants ending in f/l/ul/ull etc.

This limitation was recognised in the design of C++, which includes overload resolution; however, this is a rather complex process, which among other things, manifests in the fact that C++ has no universal ABI, unlike C does in practice. Thus universal libraries still conform to the C interface (and extern "C" functions in C++ cannot have overloads).

C is a simple language, simple to implement, and this means that not everything about it is comfortable.

Update: Consider for example run-time linking à la dlsym() or GetProcAddress(). Those work entirely by name, courtesy of the simple C ABI. Dynamic linking (or just linking, for that matter) isn't part of the C standard, nonetheless this is an immensely useful tool, which would not play well with overloading.

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+1 My comment is completely off-topic, but I have to say I always enjoy reading your answers... –  Macmade Dec 1 '11 at 0:27
    
@Macmade: Thank you, much appreciated :-) –  Kerrek SB Dec 1 '11 at 0:35
    
@KerrekSB: C1x has type-generic expressions. C99 has type-generic macros for the math library to avoid the f/l/d suffixes. –  ninjalj Dec 1 '11 at 0:39
    
@ninjalj: That's preprocessor trickery, though, isn't it? –  Kerrek SB Dec 1 '11 at 0:42
    
@KerrekSB: kind of. I think you need either type-generic expressions or typeof to implement tgmath.h, so you could say it's a relatively minor extension to the compiler or preprocessor. –  ninjalj Dec 1 '11 at 0:48

<Hideous monstruosity>:

#define cblass_gemm(type_prefix, type) void cblass_##type_prefix##gemm(       \
            const enum CBLAS_ORDER Order, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransA,  \
            const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransB, const int M, const int N,      \
            const int K, const type alpha, const type *A,                     \
            const int lda, const type *B, const int ldb,                      \
            const type beta, type *C, const int ldc)                          \
{                                                                             \
    type var;                                                                 \
}

cblass_gemm(d,double)
cblass_gemm(s,float)

That beast begets:

$ gcc -E blass.c
# 1 "blass.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command line>"
# 1 "blass.c"
# 11 "blass.c"
void cblass_dgemm( const enum CBLAS_ORDER Order, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransA, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransB, const int M, const int N, const int K, const double alpha, const double *A, const int lda, const double *B, const int ldb, const double beta, double *C, const int ldc) { double var; }
void cblass_sgemm( const enum CBLAS_ORDER Order, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransA, const enum CBLAS_TRANSPOSE TransB, const int M, const int N, const int K, const float alpha, const float *A, const int lda, const float *B, const int ldb, const float beta, float *C, const int ldc) { float var; }

Of course, your editor's syntax highlighting has just become less than useful.

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As the comments have pointed out, there is no function overloading in C, which is perhaps A Good Thing. But I have a suggestion. Suppose we have:

void foo(double *);

Then of course we can't compile the following fragment:

float f;
foo(&f);

A possible solution is wrap foo() in a macro of the same name:

#define foo(p) do {        \
   double _ = *(p);        \
   foo(&_);                \
   *(p) = _; } while(0)

Then both foo(&f); and double d; foo(&d); will compile.

Some notes:

  • The do {...} while (0) code is to 'swallow semi-colons'.

  • This macro needs a name for its temporary double; I've chosen _. This will hopefully avoid gcc's 'shadow' warnings. An alternative is to use a_very_long_name.

  • This has 'macro semantics', and so the (unlikely) double *d; foo(d++); would not work. But if this is possible in your environment, you should follow convention, and name the macro FOO rather than foo.

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