Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there an easy way of iterating over nested dictionary, which may consist of other objects like lists, tuples, then again dictionaries so that iteration covers all the elements of these other objects?

For example, if I type a key of a nested dictionary object, I would get it all listed in the Python interpreter.


[edit] here is example dictionary:

{
'key_1': 'value_1',
'key_2': {'key_21': [(2100, 2101), (2110, 2111)],
      'key_22': ['l1', 'l2'],
      'key_23': {'key_231': 'v'},
      'key_24': {'key_241': 502,
             'key_242': [(5, 0), (7, 0)],
             'key_243': {'key_2431': [0, 0],
                 'key_2432': 504,
                 'key_2433': [(11451, 0), (11452, 0)]
                },
             'key_244': {'key_2441': {'key_24411': {'key_244111': 'v_24411',
                                'key_244112': [(5549, 0)]
                               },
                          'key_24412':'v_24412'
                         },
                 'key_2441': ['ll1', 'll2']
                }
            },
     }
}

sorry for being unreadable, but I did the best that I could.

share|improve this question
2  
Can you give us a specific example? –  David Alber Dec 1 '11 at 0:33
    
For the second part of your question, you might want a pretty printer. –  miku Dec 1 '11 at 0:37
1  
Why down-voting without providing reason for it? Is question badly asked? Is dictionary object example bad? It's just part of much larger dictionary for which I want to use graphviz in automated manner if possible without crawling by hand –  theta Dec 1 '11 at 1:22
1  
well, some people are just trigger happy when they see other people attempting to iterate through dictionaries or hash tables –  prusswan Dec 23 '11 at 2:30

4 Answers 4

def recurse(d):
  if type(d)==type({}):
    for k in d:
      recurse(d[k])
  else:
    print d
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't work for me –  theta Dec 1 '11 at 1:12

Iterating over a nested dictionary containing unexpected nested elements.

Here is my solution :

# d is the nested dictionary

for item in d:
    if type(item) == list:
        print "Item is a list"
        for i in item: print i
    elif type(item) == dict:
        print "Item is a dict"
        for i in item: print i
    elif type(item) == tuple:
        print "Item is a tuple"
        for i in item: print i
    else:
        print "Item is not a list, neither a dict and not even a tuple"
        print item

I think the above example is very general, you can mold it for your use case.

share|improve this answer

What about using a general-purpose wrapper generator, like the following:

def recursive(coll):
    """Return a generator for all atomic values in coll and its subcollections.
    An atomic value is one that's not iterable as determined by iter."""
    try:
        k = iter(coll)
        for x in k:
            for y in recursive(x):
                yield y
    except TypeError:
        yield coll


def test():
    t = [[1,2,3], 4, 5, [6, [7, 8], 9]]
    for x in recursive(t):
        print x
share|improve this answer
1  
I get: RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded –  theta Dec 1 '11 at 1:12

Here is another solution,

#!/usr/bin/python

d = {'key_1': 'value_1',
     'key_2': {'key_21': [(2100, 2101), (2110, 2111)],
           'key_22': ['l1', 'l2'],
           'key_23': {'key_231': 'v'},
           'key_24': {'key_241': 502,
                      'key_242': [(5, 0), (7, 0)],
                      'key_243': {'key_2431': [0, 0],
                                  'key_2432': 504,
                                  'key_2433': [(11451, 0), (11452, 0)]},
                      'key_244': {'key_2441': ['ll1', 'll2']}}}}

def search_it(nested, target):
    found = []
    for key, value in nested.iteritems():
        if key == target:
            found.append(value)
        elif isinstance(value, dict):
            found.extend(search_it(value, target))
        elif isinstance(value, list):
            for item in value:
                if isinstance(item, dict):
                    found.extend(search_it(item, target))
        else:
            if key == target:
                found.append(value)
    return found

keys = [ 'key_242', 'key_243', 'key_242', 'key_244', 'key_1' ]

for key in keys:
    f = search_it(d, key)
    print 'Key: %s, value: %s' % (key, f[0])

Output:

Key: key_242, value: [(5, 0), (7, 0)]
Key: key_243, value: {'key_2433': [(11451, 0), (11452, 0)], 'key_2432': 504, 'key_2431': 
 [0, 0]}
Key: key_242, value: [(5, 0), (7, 0)]
Key: key_244, value: {'key_2441': ['ll1', 'll2']}
Key: key_1, value: value_1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.